Polar Express Experience at Nana Teresa’s

Nana Teresa’s is offering a hot cocoa bar, weather permitting, beginning at 6:00 p.m., on December 2, 2017, in the lawn of their historic district shop. Purchase a cup of hot cocoa and have fun creating your own special drink with items from their buffet: Marshmallows, Peppermint Sticks, Chocolate Sauce, Candy Toppings, Whipped Cream and so much more!

Local store, BUYGO, will be on hand with some special treats and there will be plenty of giveaways and super fun door prizes. The Rendezvous Film Festival will begin screening “The Polar Express” at 7:00 PM on the bakery’s lawn.

The showing is FREE, but due to limited space you’ll want to get here early to grab your treats and seats. Kids are encouraged to wear their PJs, bring a lawn chair, and a include a blanket.

This is going to be an amazing outdoor event!

How to Flush Out Kidney Stones

Have you ever heard that passing a kidney stone is more painful than giving birth? Each year, more than 1 million people in the U.S. rush to the emergency room with pain caused by a kidney stone. Kidney stones are hard, pebble-like pieces of material that form in one or both kidneys. They’re caused by high levels of certain minerals in your urine. Stones vary in size from tiny crystals that can only be seen with a microscope to stones over an inch wide. Tiny stones may pass out of your body without your even noticing. With larger stones, you won’t be so lucky. Stones that are larger than a pencil eraser can get stuck in the urinary tract—and that can really hurt.

Everyone is at some risk for developing kidney stones. “It is a very common condition,” says Dr. Ziya Kirkali, a urologist at NIH. “One out of 11 individuals in the U.S. is affected by this disease.” Kidney stones can form at any age, but they usually appear during middle age (40s to 60s). Of those who develop one stone, half will develop at least one more in the future.

“Probably one of the most important reasons why people form stones is dehydration,” Kirkali says. When urine is too concentrated, minerals can build up and form stones. “I can’t over-emphasize the importance of drinking plenty of water, because that’s the most effective way of preventing kidney stone disease.”

During the warmest months of the year, you’re at greatest risk of becoming dehydrated. “So it is really important to drink more than you usually drink during the cooler days or months,” Kirkali says.

To detect kidney stones, your doctor may order lab or imaging tests. Lab tests look in urine for blood, signs of infection, minerals (like calcium), and stones. Blood tests can also detect high levels of certain minerals. “About 80% of all stones are made of calcium oxalate,” Kirkali says. Knowing what the stones are made of can help guide treatment.

Treatment also depends on the stone’s size and location. CT scans or plain X-ray imaging can help your doctor pinpoint the location and estimate the size of a kidney stone. Depending on what your doctor finds, you may be prescribed medicine and advised to drink a lot of fluids. Or, you might need a procedure to break up or remove the kidney stone.

There are different procedures for breaking up or removing kidney stones. One method delivers shock waves to the stone from outside of the body. Other strategies involve inserting a tool into the body, either through the urinary tract or directly into the kidney through surgery. After the stone is located, it can be broken up into smaller pieces.

Once you’ve had a kidney stone, you have an increased chance for having another. NIH-supported scientists are studying ways to prevent kidney stones from returning. “We always tell our patients to drink more, but it’s not so easy to really increase your fluid intake,” Kirkali says. A new study is testing a method to encourage people to drink more fluids each day. Other NIH-funded studies are trying to unravel why some people seem more at risk of developing kidney stones. Still others are looking into how to better detect stones and treat them.

Don’t let the pain of kidney stones send you to the emergency room. Keep hydrated! But if you develop any of the symptoms shown in the “Wise Choices” box, see your doctor right away.

Written by: NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

Cummer Museum of Art Receives Awards

Press Release Jacksonville, Fla. — The Cummer Museum of Arts & Gardens is honored to announce that it has received two awards in the 2017 Museums Publications Design Competition of the American Alliance of Museums. The Museum received Second Prize in the Annual Report category, as well as an Honorable Mention in the Book category for “The Chef’s Canvas.”

The Museum’s annual report is a collection of stories and descriptions of events, exhibitions, and programs hosted by the Museum over the past year. It highlights the accomplishments and the impact of the Museum on the community, from exhibitions such as LIFT: Contemporary Expressions of the African American Experience to education programs like Cummer in the Classroom. The Museum utilizes the report as an opportunity for transparency and to spotlight the outcomes of the work it does for its constituents. The annual report was designed by Wingard Creative and printed by Agility Press, Inc. Photography for the report was done by local photographers Ingrid Damiani and Dennis Ho.

The Chef’s Canvas is a beautifully-designed coffee table cookbook celebrating the Museum’s diverse collection of art and the abundant talent of local chefs. Each dish was inspired by a work of art each chef selected from the Museum’s collection. The artwork chosen spans a wide range of artistic styles, and the paired food dishes are just as beautifully diverse. Each recipe includes a statement from the chef about the inspiration for their dish, the work of art chosen, and a beautiful image of the finished dish. The book is a way of connecting the art and culinary worlds of Northeast Florida in a unique and compelling way. “The Chef’s Canvas” project was managed by Cari Sanchez-Potter and Emily Moody, designed by Varick Rosete, photographed by Agnes Lopez, and printed by The Hartley Press.

The American Alliance of Museums and the Award
The American Alliance of Museums (AAM) has been bringing museums together since 1906, helping to gather members, share knowledge, and provide advocacy on issues of concern to the entire museum community. The AAM represents more than 35,000 individual museum professionals, volunteers, institutions, and corporate partners serving museums. The AAM’s Museum Publications Design Competition is the only national juried competition of its kind. Winners are chosen for their overall design excellence, creativity, and ability to express the institution’s personality, mission, or special features. The judges have sole authority over all decisions, including whether or not to award prizes in each of the entry categories. The Cummer Museum is honored to have won such a prestigious prize for not one but two publications.

Form Your Future for College Bound Students

Press release: Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ), in partnership with the University of North Florida, Edward Waters College, Duval County Public Schools, the Nassau County School District, Year Up Jacksonville, Earn Up and the JAX Chamber, is hosting Form Your Future, a free event that helps college-bound students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form.

Form Your Future takes place Saturday, November 18, 2017, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at both the FSCJ Advanced Technology Center, located on FSCJ Downtown Campus, and the FSCJ Betty P. Cook Nassau Center.

This annual event provides free, in-person, financial aid guidance to help all incoming students and/or their parents/guardians prepare for a smooth transition to begin college. Students who attend Form Your Future also have the opportunity to enter for a chance to receive scholarship money. Participating colleges and universities are giving away more than $35,000 in scholarships.

The addresses for each location are listed below:

FSCJ Advanced Technology Center (next to Downtown Campus, between Pearl and Broad streets)
401 W. State Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202

FSCJ Betty P. Cook Nassau Center (just east of I-95 off of SR A1A)
76346 William Burgess Blvd., Yulee, FL 32097

Professional financial aid staff and counselors will be on hand at both locations to offer free help in all aspects of the application process. In order to complete the FAFSA, parents and students should bring the following:

* Social Security number, driver’s license or alien registration card
* 2016 IRS 1040 or latest tax return and W-2 statements
* Federal Student Aid ID (Don’t have one? Create one at fsaid.ed.gov.)

For more information, visit formyourfuture.org/.

Relay For Life Pub Crawl for a Cure in Historic Fernandina Beach

Relay For Life Fernandina Beach/Yulee teams are thrilled to wrap-up their 2017 season by announcing their 3rd Annual Pub Crawl For a Cure in historic, Fernandina Beach, Florida. The Pub Crawl For a Cure invites you to crimp your hair and find those leg warmers as we bring back the 1980s and crawl our way through seven of Amelia Island’s iconic restaurants, pubs, and saloons.

Fighting back against a disease that has taken too much, Relay For Life is an opportunity for communities to honor cancer survivors and remember loved ones lost. Fund raising continues year ’round and culminates in the Annual Relay For Life Event where teams set up camp and take turns walking or running around a track or path to continue the fight against cancer. Because cancer never sleeps, each team is asked to have at least one participant on the track at all times.

Here is the 411 – The Pub Crawl For a Cure will be held on Saturday, November 18, 2017, beginning at 6:00 p.m. at the Crab Trap on North Second Street, with an after-party starting at 9:00 p.m. at the Palace Saloon. Other sponsors include the Green Turtle Tavern, Pablo’s, Pajama Dave’s, Amelia Tavern, and the Salty Pelican. Participating venues and team members will be selling coupon books for $30.00 in advance or $35.00 at the door. Souvenier T-shirts and prize drawing tickets will also be available.

Team members, sponsors, and attendees can take pride in knowing they are working to create a world where cancer no longer threatens our loved ones. So Come on Eileen, Mickey, Billie Jean and Jessie’s Girl, and join us as we raise money to Beat It, and take a Sledgehammer to cancer.

For more information please find our facebook event page at facebook.com/events/142075753086679/ or call Erica Watts (706) 380-1362.

All proceeds benefit Relay For Life and the American Cancer Society.

What’s the Difference Between Bronchitis and Pneumonia?

Coughs help your body clear your airways of irritants and prevent infection. But a deep cough from your chest may signal bronchitis or pneumonia. Although they may have different underlying causes, their symptoms can be similar—and both can be serious enough to send you to the doctor.

Bronchitis and pneumonia both involve Inflammation in the chest. Both can cause coughs that bring up a slimy substance called phlegm to help clear out germs and pus. And both can cause shortness of breath and wheezing.
Bronchitis is a condition in which the bronchial tubes that lead to the lungs become inflamed. Viruses, bacteria, and even toxins like tobacco smoke can inflame the bronchial tubes. Most of the time, though, bronchitis is caused by an infection with one of several types of viruses. If you develop bronchitis during flu season, a likely culprit may be the flu virus. Cold viruses are also common causes at this and other times of year.

Pneumonia is caused by an infection of the lungs. “About 1/3 of cases are caused by viruses, but most of them are bacterial related,” says Dr. Kenneth Olivier, a lung infection expert at NIH. “They’re from bacteria that are quite common, like Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonias in all ages in the U.S.”
If you get a fever with bronchitis, it is usually mild (below 101 degrees Fahrenheit). In more serious cases, you may have chest pain, feel short of breath, or wheeze when you breathe in.

“Pneumonia, on the other hand, typically is associated with fever, sometimes very high, spiking fever,” Olivier says. Breathing problems, chest pain, and other symptoms also tend to be more severe with pneumonia. If you have a fever and chills, trouble breathing, or a cough that is bringing up thick phlegm, especially if it’s yellow or green, go see your doctor.

Your doctor can listen to your lungs by placing a stethoscope on your chest. “Frequently, the physician can hear areas where the breath sounds are altered,” Olivier says. If you have pneumonia, your doctor may hear bubbling, crackling, or rumbling sounds from the lungs.

You may be sent for a chest X-ray, which can show whether the lungs contain fluid or pus from an infection. An X-ray is the best way to diagnose pneumonia and rule out bronchitis. Whichever illness you have, resting and drinking plenty of fluids are important ways to care for yourself.

If you’re diagnosed with bronchitis, your doctor probably won’t give you antibiotics. Because viruses are the usual cause of bronchitis, antibiotics are seldom helpful. If you’re wheezing, however, you may be given medicine to open your airways. Your cough may last 10 to 20 days.

Because bacteria are often the cause of pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics. It can take 1 to 4 weeks to recover from pneumonia. Some people require treatment in the hospital.

Germs that cause colds, the flu, and lower airway infections are contagious. The best way to prevent getting bronchitis or pneumonia is to avoid getting these infections. And when you’re sick, take care not to spread your germs to others (see “Wise Choices” box for tips).

Guard Against Airway Infections
-Wash your hands often with soap and water.
-Use alcohol-based hand gel if you’re unable to wash them.
-Cough into a tissue, your elbow, or your sleeve.
-Ask your doctor about vaccines for you and your children. Certain vaccines can prevent airway infections caused by harmful viruses and bacteria.
-Avoid people who are coughing or showing signs of infection.
-Avoid tobacco smoke.

Written by NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

The Craft of Writing

Press release: On November 16, 2017, “Writers by the Sea Presents… The Craft of Writing”
Fresh from the 2017 Florida Writers Association, Annual Conference, four of our Writers by the Sea authors will share insights and highlights from featured speakers: David Morrell (First Blood, Rambo); Steve Berry (2017, FL Writer of the Year); Michael Tabb (Full Sail Professor); Anne Dalton (Trademark Attorney); Mark Gottlieb (Publisher); and more. Our FWA conference participants were introduced to the craft of writing honed by these esteemed authors, agents, and publishers, and want to share the wealth with you.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS:
Writers by the Sea Panelists include Florida award winning writers: Nadine Vaughan D’Ardenne (Screenwriter), and Donna Jennings (Novelist); plus WBTS small group leader of “The Writer Within”, Marla McDaniels and 2018 WBTS Planning Committee member, Linda Guecia.

As always, we meet the third Thursday of the month, at the Amelia Island Museum of History, at 6:00pm, in Fernandina Beach, FL.

Annual Fall Book Sale 2017

Press release: The Friends of the Fernandina Beach Library’s annual Fall Book Sale kicks off Thursday, November 16th, with a special FOL members-only preview and reception from 5-7 pm at Peck Center Gym, 516 South 10th Street. If you are not a member, you are invited to join at the door or online at our website before the sale and get first choice of thousands of books, vinyl records, CDs and DVDs for sale. Memberships are $15 for students, $35 dollars for individuals, $50 for a couple or $75 for a family.

Your membership dues help to off-set the cost of the many free events sponsored by the Friends over the course of the year, from classes on various subjects to lectures to art exhibits to children’s programs.

The doors will open to all on Friday, November 17th, from 9:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Saturday, November 18th, from 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Books are carefully organized for easy browsing in dozens of categories, including fiction, biographies, art, history, children’s books, sports, cooking, audio books and more. We also have a large selection of vinyl records, CDs and DVDs, including boxed sets, for this sale. We, of course, will once again have thousands of books for sale, with most priced at $3 or less. It is always the best book sale on the island!

All proceeds from the sale support the Fernandina Beach Library. For further information regarding this event, on joining Friends of the Library, or to donate, please visit the Friends of the Library website at www.fernandinaFOL.org.

Amelia Island Welcomes Pétanque Players and Spectators

Press Release: AMELIA ISLAND, Fla. Amelia Island’s surprising French flair will be showcased during the Pétanque Amelia Island Open (Nov. 10-12), the largest pétanque event in the Americas, where world champions join enthusiastic newcomers for competition and camaraderie. Free to spectators, the tournament draws world champions and players from across the 50 states and more than 19 countries, including Mongolia and New Zealand. The competition and related festivities unfold at the waterfront courts at Fernandina Harbor marina from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 11, and from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 12. Highlights of the weekend’s activities can be found at http://bit.ly/petanqueamelia.

“Amelia Island is perfect for pétanque, a social sport with international appeal,” said Kate Harris, the Amelia Island CVB’s director of digital and international, who is producing this year’s tournament. “With our French history, harborfront historic district, and beaches, the island is not unlike the Mediterranean coast where pétanque began. During the weekend, you’ll hear dozens of languages and meet people from all over the world. It’s a true celebration of ‘joie de vivre’ on this Florida island.”

The event is free to spectators and will feature food trucks, live music at lunchtime, pop-up French lessons presented by the Alliance Francaise of Jacksonville, and artisan cocktails from Amelia Island’s own distillery, Marlin & Barrel.

The game of pétanque (pronounced pay-tonk) is growing in popularity around the world and, integrated with similar games such as bocce, is currently under consideration to be played in the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris. Teams of players compete and throw hollow steel balls across a hard-packed dirt course, aimed at a colorful wooden ball called the pig.

The 2017 event will feature a number of world champions, including 12-time champion Phillipe Quintais; Dylan Rocher, dubbed “The Crown Prince of Pétanque;” along with world champions Damien Hureau, Julien Lamour, Marco Foyot, Claudy Weibel, and seven-time champion, Bruno Le Bouriscaud.

Camille Durand, one of the up-and-coming stars of pétanque and the winner of France’s top national women’s title, will be making her first U.S. tournament appearance on Amelia Island. On Friday, Nov. 10, the finals of the Women’s Confederation Cup will take place at the harborfront courts. World Champions will be hosting training sessions and playing friendly matches against enthusiastic amateurs. At 4 p.m., two young talents (both aged 13) and their teams of veteran players will compete in a special Panam Confederation contest.

For more information, go to ameliapetanque.com.

Preventing and Treating Drug Abuse

Drug abuse can be a painful experience—for the person who has the problem, and for family and friends who may feel helpless in the face of the disease. But there are things you can do if you know or suspect that someone close to you has a drug problem.

Certain drugs can change the structure and inner workings of the brain. With repeated use, they affect a person’s self-control and interfere with the ability to resist the urge to take the drug. Not being able to stop taking a drug even though you know it’s harmful is the hallmark of addiction.

A drug doesn’t have to be illegal to cause this effect. People can become addicted to alcohol, nicotine, or even prescription drugs when they use them in ways other than prescribed or use someone else’s prescription.
People are particularly vulnerable to using drugs when going through major life transitions. For adults, this might mean during a divorce or after losing a job. For children and teens, this can mean changing schools or other major upheavals in their lives.

But kids may experiment with drug use for many different reasons. “It could be a greater availability of drugs in a school with older students, or it could be that social activities are changing, or that they are trying to deal with stress,” says Dr. Bethany Deeds, an NIH expert on drug abuse prevention. Parents may need to pay more attention to their children during these periods.

The teenage years are a critical time to prevent drug use. Trying drugs as a teenager increases your chance of developing substance use disorders. The earlier the age of first use, the higher the risk of later addiction. But addiction also happens to adults. Adults are at increased risk of addiction when they encounter prescription pain-relieving drugs after a surgery or because of a chronic pain problem. People with a history of addiction should be particularly careful with opioid pain relievers and make sure to tell their doctors about past drug use.

There are many signs that may indicate a loved one is having a problem with drugs. They might lose interest in things that they used to enjoy or start to isolate themselves. Teens’ grades may drop. They may start skipping classes.

“They may violate curfew or appear irritable, sedated, or disheveled,” says child psychiatrist Dr. Geetha Subramaniam, an NIH expert on substance use. Parents may also come across drug paraphernalia, such as water pipes or needles, or notice a strange smell.

“Once drug use progresses, it becomes less of a social thing and more of a compulsive thing—which means the person spends a lot of time using drugs,” Subramaniam says.

If a loved one is using drugs, encourage them to talk to their primary care doctor. It can be easier to have this conversation with a doctor than a family member. Not all drug treatment requires long stays in residential treatment centers. For someone in the early stages of a substance use problem, a conversation with a doctor or another professional may be enough to get them the help they need. Doctors can help the person think about their drug use, understand the risk for addiction, and come up with a plan for change.

Substance use disorder can often be treated on an outpatient basis. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy to treat. Substance use disorder is a complicated disease. Drugs can cause changes in the brain that make it extremely difficult to quit without medical help.

For certain substances, it can be dangerous to stop the drug without medical intervention. Some people may need to be in a hospital for a short time for detoxification, when the drug leaves their body. This can help keep them as safe and comfortable as possible. Patients should talk with their doctors about medications that treat addiction to alcohol or opioids, such as heroin and prescription pain relievers.

Recovering from a substance use disorder requires retraining the brain. A person who’s been addicted to drugs will have to relearn all sorts of things, from what to do when they’re bored to who to hang out with. NIH has developed a customizable wallet card to help people identify and learn to avoid their triggers, the things that make them feel like using drugs. You can order the card for free at drugpubs.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brain-wallet-card.

“You have to learn ways to deal with triggers, learn about negative peers, learn about relapse, [and] learn coping skills,” Subramaniam says.

NIH-funded scientists are studying ways to stop addiction long before it starts—in childhood. Dr. Daniel Shaw at the University of Pittsburgh is looking at whether teaching healthy caregiving strategies to parents can help promote self-regulation skills in children and prevent substance abuse later on.

Starting when children are two years old, Shaw’s study enrolls families at risk of substance use problems in a program called the Family Check-Up. It’s one of several parenting programs that have been studied by NIH-funded researchers.

During the program, a parenting consultant visits the home to observe the parents’ relationship with their child. Parents complete several questionnaires about their own and their family’s well-being. This includes any behavior problems they are experiencing with their child. Parents learn which of their children’s problem behaviors might lead to more serious issues, such as substance abuse, down the road. The consultant also talks with the parents about possible ways to change how they interact with their child. Many parents then meet with the consultants for follow-up sessions about how to improve their parenting skills.

Children whose parents are in the program have fewer behavioral problems and do better when they get to school. Shaw and his colleagues are now following these children through their teenage years to see how the program affects their chances of developing a substance abuse problem. You can find video clips explaining different ways parents can respond to their teens on the NIH Family Checkup website at www.drugabuse.gov/family-checkup.

Even if their teen has already started using drugs, parents can still step in. They can keep closer tabs on who their children’s friends are and what they’re doing. Parents can also help by finding new activities that will introduce their children to new friends and fill up the after-school hours—prime time for getting into trouble. “They don’t like it at first,” Shaw says. But finding other teens with similar interests can help teens form new habits and put them on a healthier path.

A substance use problem is a chronic disease that requires lifestyle adjustments and long-term treatment, like diabetes or high blood pressure. Even relapse can be a normal part of the process—not a sign of failure, but a sign that the treatment needs to be adjusted. With good care, people who have substance use disorders can live healthy, productive lives. 

Written by: NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

Holiday Mailbox Decorating Class

Landscape Matters will present a holiday mailbox decorating class on Wednesday, November 15, 10 am until 11:30 a.m. at the Yulee County Building (86026 Pages Dairy Road).
(Take US 17 North, pass over the railroad tracks, turn left on Pages Dairy Road. The building is attached to the fire station.)
 
Nassau Master Gardener Carol Ann Atwood and avid holiday decorator Sylvie Baxter will conduct a Landscape Matters class on how to make your mailbox “holiday ready” using cuttings from your own yard, e.g., magnolia, spruce, pine, palmetto, pittosporum, palms, holly with berries, etc. and ornamental décor.

Admittance is free. To “make and take” your own mailbox cover with materials provided by the instructor, the fee is $20. Checks should be made out to University of Florida. Registration deadline is Friday, November 10 by 5 pm. (It is a holiday for Extension but checks may be dropped in the mail slot at the offices either in Callahan or Yulee.) Late registration fee is $30. Only ONE mailbox cover per person.

To download registration form:
http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/nassauco/2017/07/25/holiday-mailbox-decorating/

For more information contact the Extension office at 530-6351. Master Gardeners are on phone duty Fridays, from 10 am until 2 pm at 530-6351, press “1” for the Yulee Extension office.
 

American Indians, Trees for Troops, and Petanque Only Some of the Agenda

The regular meeting of the Fernandina Beach City Commission will be held on NOVEMBER 8, 2017, at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall Chambers on Ash Street. Here is the agenda:

1. CALL TO ORDER    
2. ROLL CALL    
3. Pledge of Allegiance and Invocation by Reverend James Tippins, Baptist Medical Center Nassau Senior Chaplain.     

4. PROCLAMATIONS      
4.1 PROCLAMATION ­ NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN HERITAGE MONTH ­ 
Proclaims the month of November, 2017, as “National American Indian Heritage Month”. Ms. Nadine D’Ardenne,  American Indian Representative, will be present to accept the Proclamation.      
 
4.2 PROCLAMATION ­TREES FOR AMERICA’S TROOPS, INC.  ­ 
Recognizes Trees for America’s Troops, Inc. for providing United States military servicemen and servicewomen on  deployment with decorated Christmas trees and essential items to help them overcome the drudgery  and hardships of faraway duty. Trees for America’s Troops, Inc. President Ms. Judi Mixon­Brown will  be present to accept the Proclamation.      
 
4.3 PROCLAMATION PÉTANQUE AMELIA ISLAND OPEN  ­ 
Recognizes the 8th Annual Petanque Amelia Open and names the tournament’s founder, Mr. Philippe Boets, the Official Ambassador of the Pétanque Amelia Island Open.      

5. PUBLIC COMMENT REGARDING ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA OR ITEMS ON THE  CONSENT AGENDA    

6. CONSENT AGENDA    
 
6.1 Synopsis: Declares certain property as surplus, and authorizes the disposal of such.
6.2 Synopsis: Approves three additional applications for exemption of payment for  City Sewer, Refuse, and Stormwater costs for the months of October 1, 2017, through September 30,  2018.
6.3 Synopsis: Awards  RFP #17­03 for the City’s disaster public assistance services to Witt O’Brien’s, LLC.       
6.4 Synopsis: Approves the Utility Work by Highway Contractor Agreement between the City of Fernandina Beach and the  Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). Also authorizes the City Manager to bind the City for deeds,  easements, agreements, licenses, permits and other agreements related to any services,  facilities or usage of properties and rights­of­way owned by the FDOT costing no more than $20,000.      
 
6.5 FINAL PLAT APPROVAL ­ DUNES OF AMELIA, PHASE TWO ­ RESOLUTION 2017­171  APPROVING FINAL PLAT, PAB CASE 2017­10 TITLED “DUNES OF AMELIA, PHASE TWO”;  AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Synopsis: Accepts and approves the plat titled  “Dunes of Amelia, Phase Two” as a final plat.       
 
6.6 Synopsis: Accepts and approves the plat titled  “Lakeside Reserve” as a preliminary plat.       
 
6.7 Synopsis: Approves transfers within respective Departments/Funds for  FY 2016/2017.
       
7. RESOLUTIONS    
7.1 Synopsis: Approves  the  Comcast  Enterprise  Services  Master  Services  Agreement,  The  First  Amendment to the agreement, and the Renewal Service Order.      
 
7.2 Synopsis:  Approves the purchase of two servers and a storage device from Dell, Inc. and the purchasing  agreement.       
 
7.3 Synopsis: Approves a transfer of $35,600 to the Golf Repairs/Maintenance Grounds account from the Golf Reserve account and a transfer of $202,850 to the Airport Repairs/Maintenance Building and Grounds account from the Airport Reserve account.      
 
7.4 Synopsis: Authorizes the City to enter into Agreement No. LP45011 with FDEP  in the amount of $500,000 for the North Fletcher Drainage Basin Project.      
 
7.5 Synopsis:  Authorizes the City to enter into a cost­share agreement with SJRWMD to accept an award of  $251,283 for the construction improvements to the Area 1 drainage system.      
 
7.6 Synopsis: Authorizes the City to request a maintenance easement along the  existing ditch from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP).      
 
7.7 Synopsis:  Approves reimbursement to the City from a future debt issue for costs related to the General Aviation  Terminal project incurred before the debt is issued.      
 
7.8 Synopsis: Approves Task Order #2017­02 with Olsen  Associates, Inc. for Coastal Engineering Services for Beach Management.      
 
7.9 Synopsis: Approves Task Order  #2017­03 with Olsen Associates, Inc. for coastal engineering services for the Alternate Renourishment Project.      
 
7.10 Synopsis: Awards RFQ #17­03 to Brockington and Associates, Inc. for the Historic Resources Survey Update.      
 
7.11 Synopsis: Approves the Construction and Financial Agreement  between Eight Flags Aviation, LLC and the City of Fernandina Beach. Authorizes the City Manager to negotiate and execute a public ramp apron management agreement with Eight Flags Aviation, LLC and authorizes the City Manager to execute Change Order 1 with F&G Construction, not to exceed the original award amount, for the addition of a nose and tail section to the Airport Terminal.           

8. ORDINANCES ­ FIRST READING    
8.1 Synopsis: Amends the Land Development Code specific to variances.       
 
8.2 Synopsis: Approves a Planned Unit Development (PUD) overlay to approximately 5.10 acres located on S. 13th Street between  Hickory Street and Fir Street.      
9. CITY MANAGER REPORTS    
10. CITY ATTORNEY REPORTS    
11. CITY CLERK REPORTS    
12. MAYOR/COMMISSIONER COMMENTS    
13. ADJOURNMENT

Cummer Amelia: Cocktails and Cavases

Cocktails & Canvases Saturday Night White Canvas Chef’s Dinner
The Cocktails & Canvases White Canvas Chef’s Dinner will be hosted at Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort. It will be an immersive culinary event. The evening’s White Canvas menu, led by Executive Chef Daven Wardynski will tease the senses with his culinary exploration in a vibrant visual art setting featuring Amelia Island artist Casey Matthews. This one-of-a-kind experience can’t be missed!
Satuday, November 11, 2017, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Price is $150 plus vendor fee per person

Cocktails & Canvases Main Event Package
Guests will enjoy an unmatched experience with artists, mixologists, and chefs. Stay with the Cocktails & Canvases Main Event package and enjoy an immersive culinary and visual arts dinner. Sunday morning, enjoy the “Art of Breakfast” buffet in Sunrise Café, overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, followed by a Local Art Festival in the Shops of Omni Amelia Island Plantation. Includes one-night hotel accommodation.
November 11th and 12th, Only $619 per package based on double occupancy

For further information or to register, visit cocktailscanvases.com. Cummer Museum Members, enter “Museum” in the discount code box when registering.

Pasta Sale at the Farmers Market

The Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market will be open Saturday, November 4, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., rain or shine. This open air market is located on North Seventh Street in historic, downtown Fernandina Beach and features nearly 40 tents of seasonal produce, fresh baked breads and pastries, and a wide variety of specialty foods and natural bath products.

Amelia Pasta, a long standing staple at the farmers market is holding a Pasta Blowout Sale – all in-stock flavors of penne, linguini, fettuccini, and orzo are on sale for only $5.00 per bag, no rainchecks.

Boatright Farm’s crops have rotated to fall harvests and they still have plenty of squash in addition to their turnip and mustard greens, as well as some nice heads of cabbage.

Camp Craft Cocktails is turning out to be one of our most popular booths. They sell jars of quality ingredients that are perfect for sharing with friends or sipping alone. Simply add 12 ounces of your favorite spirit, chill for three days and enjoy eight servings. Flavors include Aromatic Citrus, Bloody Mary, or Hibiscus Ginger Lemon.

Our Booth with a Cause this week is the Salvation Army’s Hope House. They are dedicated to restoring those in need to a place of productivity and self-sufficiency, values that are necessary for a community to grow and prosper. Stop by their booth to learn more about what they are doing in our community.

We hope you will come downtown with your family and friends and sample a taste of what the Market Place offers. Live entertainment will be provided by Melrose, and well-behaved, leashed pets are welcome to join you.

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