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Amelia Island Prepping for Ninth Annual Restaurant Week

Amelia Island, FL – Northeast Florida’s Amelia Island will host its ninth annual Restaurant Week, Jan. 20-29. The 10-day culinary showcase will feature culinary events and fixed lunch and dinner menus at a wide selection of the island’s most popular and award-winning dining establishments. The lunch option is $12 per person and includes an entrée, side and a non-alcoholic beverage, while the dinner option (priced at either $21 or $31 per person) includes three courses and a beverage. Menus, restaurant listings, special event information and discounted hotel packages can be found online at www.ameliaisland.com/yummy.

“Restaurant Week has become one of our most anticipated annual events and is the perfect time for hungry visitors and locals try some of the island’s new culinary hotspots and enjoy their old favorites,” said Gil Langley, President and CEO of the Amelia Island Convention and Visitors Bureau. “This Restaurant Week will include several new tours, cooking classes and other events we’ve added to the menu.”

Among the new 2017 Amelia Island Restaurant Week special events is the “Distillers Dinner” on Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation, a playful reflection of clear, blonde and brown spirits to kick-off the week. Executive Chef Daven Wardynski and his culinary team will highlight the distillation process of each spirit and how it relates to flavors of our island in the winter. The four-course dinner will focus on Vodka, Gin, Whiskey and Rum, each course mindfully paired with a cocktail. Tickets for the dinner are $100 and available by calling 904-432-1467.

On Saturday, Jan. 28, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island will wrap up Restaurant Week with “A Bourbon Affair,” a craft cocktail event at the Lobby Bar, celebrating specialty spirits. Starting at 7:30 p.m., guests will sample small-batch and house-infused bourbons, whiskeys and craft cocktails while enjoying small plate selections of fresh sushi and sashimi. The evening includes select wines and hors d’ oeuvres, as well as presentations from visiting Mixologist Bob Peters and The Ritz-Carlton’s Head Mixologist Johnny Love. Additional tableside infusions and flights of select bourbons, scotches and sakes will be available. Tickets are available for $125 per person by calling 904-277-1087.

Available again this year is a Mixology Tour with Amelia Island Downtown Tasting Tours. With available dates throughout January, the tour includes stops at four local bars. At each stop, guests will learn about the bar’s history and enjoy a specially prepared cocktail. Tickets are available for $45 per person by calling 904-330-5746.

During Restaurant Week, aspiring chefs can attend cooking classes hosted by the Amelia Island Culinary Academy. Available themed classes include Parisian Café, Hands-On Pasta Making, a Farmer’s Market Tour & Class, as well as a Children’s Pasta Camp, ideal for a parents’ night out. For information, please call (904) 515-6863.

Nearly 30 of the island’s most popular restaurants are participating in the 2017 Amelia Island Restaurant Week, providing fixed menus for either lunch, dinner or both. The list of participating restaurants currently includes:

29 South Eats Gilberts Underground Kitchen Marina Seafood Restaurant
Bar Zin Hola Cuban Café Oceanside
Brett’s Waterway Café Horizons The Patio Place
Burlingame Restaurant Jack & Diane’s Café Pi Infinite Combinations
Cafe Karibo Joe’s 2nd Street Bistro The Salty Pelican
Ciao Bistro La Mancha Restaurant The Surf Restaurant & Bar
Coast at The Ritz-Carlton Le Clos of Amelia Island Verandah
Crab Trap Lechonera El Coqui Cucina South Italian Bistro
Lucas on Centre España Restaurant & Tapas Lulus

For a complete listing of menus, participating restaurants, special event information and discounted hotel packages, visit www.ameliaisland.com/yummy.

FSCJ to Host Community Conversation Series

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) will host the first of a three-part Community Conversation Series in an effort to provide an open dialogue forum for the College’s internal and external community.

Following the success of the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office’s (JSO) “Coffee with a Cop” program at FSCJ, the College aims to further assist in strengthening community relations with the introduction of this series.

The opening forum of the Community Conversation Series will explore the state of
relations between Jacksonville’s community and the law enforcement officers that
serve to protect it.

Students and community members will have the opportunity to pose questions and offer solutions on topics ranging anywhere from legal implications to psychological and sociological impacts.

A panel of FSCJ faculty members will provide interdisciplinary perspectives. Faculty members include:

* Director of Security Gordon Bass
* Professor of Psychology Dr. Penny Devine
* Professor of Criminal Justice Kimberly Hall
* Professor of Legal Studies Dr. Nick Martino
* Professor of Sociology Dr. JR Woodward

FSCJ faculty will be joined on the panel by Assistant Chief T.K. Waters with the Jacksonville’s Sheriff’s Office.

Students from the University of North Florida (UNF), Edward Waters College (EWC),
Jacksonville University (JU) as well as regional community members are encouraged to attend.

For more information and to RSVP no later than Monday, December 5, contact Barry Summers via email or by calling (904) 381-3436.

WHEN:
Thursday, December 8, 2016, from 6 – 8 p.m.

WHERE:
Florida State College at Jacksonville Kent Campus-Room D-120
3939 Roosevelt Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32205

Hickox Now President of Florida Property Appraisers

Nassau County, FL – Property Appraiser A. Michael Hickox has been elected by his peers to serve as the President of the Florida Association of Property Appraiser’s.

The Florida Association of Property Appraiser’s (FAPA) is a statewide professional organization composed of locally elected, constitutionally authorized Property Appraisers. The mission of FAPA is to actively work with the Florida Legislature by providing technical assistance and advice in drafting ad valorem legislation affecting Florida citizens and property appraiser’s offices.

Hickox, took the position last month and is ready for the challenges ahead. “My goal is to ensure that property tax policies will benefit citizens throughout the state. Our organization will do this by effectively advocating for residential and commercial property owners.”

Hickox previously served as the organizations President-Elect and Legislative Committee Chairman where he met with legislators regarding proposed policies affecting property valuation and property tax exemptions.

AIDS Memorial Quilt Ceremony and Display

December 1, 2016, you have the opportunity to join others and remember our brothers and sisters lost to HIV/AIDS and offer hope to those who live with HIV/AIDS.

AIDS Memorial Quilt Ceremony and Display
12:00PM Event Is Free and open to the public
Atrium of Jacksonville City Hall
117 W Duval Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202

Service of Remembrance and Hope
A nondenominational event to remember the lives lost to HIV/AIDS and offer hope to those who live with HIV/AIDS in anticipation of a cure and the elimination of any new infections.
7:00PM Event is Free and open to the public
Arlington Congregational Church
431 University Blvd N
Jacksonville, FL 32211

For more information, please visit www.neflworldaidsday.org.

The Benefits of Daily Cleaning Between Teeth

You may have seen or heard news stories suggesting that you can forget about flossing, since scientists lack solid evidence that you’ll benefit from cleaning between your teeth with a sturdy string. But many dentists may beg to differ. They’ve seen the teeth and gums of people who floss regularly and those who haven’t. The differences can be striking.

“Every dentist in the country can look in someone’s mouth and tell whether or not they floss,” says Dr. Tim Iafolla, a dental health expert at NIH. Red or swollen gums that bleed easily can be a clear sign that flossing and better dental habits are needed. “Cleaning all sides of your teeth, including between your teeth where the toothbrush can’t reach, is a good thing,” Iafolla says.

If dentists, and maybe even your personal experience, suggest that regular flossing keeps your mouth healthy, then why the news reports? It’s because long-term, large-scale, carefully controlled studies of flossing have been somewhat limited.

Researchers have found modest benefits from flossing in small clinical studies. For instance, an analysis of 12 well-controlled studies found that flossing plus toothbrushing reduced mild gum disease, or gingivitis, significantly better than toothbrushing alone. These same studies reported that flossing plus brushing might reduce plaque after 1 or 3 months better than just brushing.

But there’s no solid evidence that flossing can prevent periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease that’s the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. Periodontitis can arise if mild gum disease is left untreated. Plaque may then spread below the gum line, leading to breakdown of bone and other tissues that support your teeth. Periodontitis develops slowly over months or years. Most flossing studies to date, however, have examined only relatively short time periods.

Another research challenge is that large, real-world studies of flossing must rely on people accurately reporting their dental cleaning habits. And people tend to report what they think is the “right” answer when it comes to their health behaviors, whether flossing, exercising, smoking, or eating. That’s why well-controlled studies (where researchers closely monitor flossing or perform the flossing) tend to show that flossing is effective. But real-world studies result in weaker evidence.

“The fact that there hasn’t been a huge population-based study of flossing doesn’t mean that flossing’s not effective,” Iafolla says. “It simply suggests that large studies are difficult and expensive to conduct when you’re monitoring health behaviors of any kind.”

While the scientific evidence for flossing benefits may be somewhat lacking, there’’s little evidence for any harm or side effects from flossing, and it’s low cost. So why not consider making it part of your daily routine?

Talk to your dentist if you have any questions or concerns about your teeth or gums. If flossing is difficult, the dentist may recommend other ways to remove plaque between teeth, such as with a water flosser or interdental cleaners. “If you need help learning how to floss, or if you don’t think you’re doing it right, your dentist or hygienist will be happy to show you how,” Iafolla says. “It helps to know the proper technique.”

Article by NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Vicki Contie
Contributors: Erin Calhoun, Vicki Contie, Alan Defibaugh (illustrations), Bonnie Tabasko, and Carol Torgan.

2nd Annual Children’s Holiday Extravaganza

The 2nd Annual Friends of the Library Children’s Holiday Extravaganza will be held Saturday, December 3, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Fernandina Beach Library, 24 North 4th Street.

There will be readings of several popular holiday books and an arts and crafts station that coincides with the themes of the featured books.

There will be guest appearances from some local firemen who will let the children tour one of their firetrucks. Other surprises are also in store.

For more information, please call the library at (904) 277-7365.

Make Smart Choices as You Celebrate the Season

Mashed potatoes and gravy, Grandma’s apple pie, and other holiday favorites can be a joyous part of any celebration. But to feel your best, you know you need to eat in moderation and stay active. How can you avoid temptation when delicious foods and calories abound?

“From Halloween through New Year’s, there’s always a decision to make about food,” says Dr. Marci Gluck, an NIH psychologist who studies obesity and eating behaviors. Tasty treats tend to appear more often at work and festive gatherings, and to come as gifts. They may also tempt you when grocery shopping. “As the holidays approach, it’s important to think ahead and make a plan,” Gluck says.

Consider your health goals for the holiday season, whether it’s avoiding overeating, staying active, connecting with others, reducing stress, or preventing weight gain. You can plan to make time for buying healthy groceries, cooking at home, scheduling regular physical activity, and setting aside a little quiet time for yourself.

Gluck suggests you start by adopting a flexible mindset. “Many people have an attitude of all or nothing: either I’m on a diet or I’m not on a diet,” she says. This “either-or” thinking can lead to negative self-talk, or being hard on yourself for small indulgences, overeating, or weight gain.

“Most people just throw their plan out the window when they think they’ve slipped up, and they ‘fall off the wagon,'” Gluck says. “Celebrations don’t have to derail your lifestyle. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to follow your plan and eat healthy.”

Look for opportunities to make healthy choices and feel good about them. “Small choices really can make big changes,” Gluck says. “Each moment that you put something in your mouth or choose to exercise adds up over time. That can be true for weight loss or weight gain.”

Around the holidays, we often find ourselves with too many food options, for too many days in a row. It can be challenging to decide what to eat and when to say no.

“Eat what you love—in moderation,” suggests Jody Engel, a nutritionist and registered dietitian at NIH. Consider choosing items that are unique to the season, instead of eating foods you can have any time of the year.

When you feel the urge to splurge in unhealthy ways, Engel recommends trying something else first, like drinking a glass of water, eating a piece of fruit, or climbing a few flights of stairs. You might even consider walking around your house or office for 5 minutes or more. Such diversions might be enough to help you resist unhealthy temptations.

You could also try eating mindfully, Engel suggests. Slow down to really taste and enjoy your food. Eating more slowly also allows your body time to signal your brain when you’re full, which takes about 20 minutes. If you eat too much too quickly, it’s easy to gobble up as much as twice what your body needs before your brain even gets the message.

Dr. Susanne Votruba, an NIH obesity and nutrition researcher, says it’s a good idea to identify and avoid any “trigger foods”—foods that may spur you to binge or eat more than usual. Overeating can bring feelings of bloating, reflux, indigestion, and nausea.

“Some people can eat less healthy foods in moderation and be fine, or have ‘cheat days’ where they allow themselves to eat whatever they want for a day and stay on track for the rest of the week,” Votruba says. “Others may have to avoid certain ‘trigger foods’ completely, or they’ll spiral into unhealthy eating patterns for the rest of the week or abandon their plan altogether. Everyone is different.”

Because of these differences, Votruba says, it’s important not to force food on other people. “Even if you don’t have an issue with food, be aware of other people around you, and respect their choices,” she says.

What if you do fall to temptation? “Every day is a new day when it comes to eating,” Votruba says. “If you overeat one day, work to get back on track the next meal or next day.”

While food is a big part of the holidays, remember that there are other paths to staying healthy. “Don’t make the holidays be just about food,” Votruba suggests. “The key is not only what you eat, but how much you’re moving. Even little bits of extra exercise can be very helpful for everyone over the holidays.”

Plan ahead for how you’ll add physical activity to days that might otherwise involve a lot of sitting. Get the whole family involved, Engel suggests. “You have to make an effort to incorporate exercise into days of big eating,” she says. “Otherwise the day will come and go.”

Sign up to walk or run a community race. Enjoy catching up with family or friends on a walk or jog instead of on the couch. In between meals, take a family hike at a nearby park, stroll around your neighborhood, or play a game of flag football.

The emotions of winter celebrations come into this picture, too. “Joy, sadness, and stress are associated with overeating during the holidays,” Gluck says. “People who are emotional eaters may be particularly vulnerable to temptations around the holidays.”

If holiday stress causes you to derail your healthy plans, consider ways to reduce stress and manage emotions. These might include talking to a trusted friend, meditation, physical activity, or just getting outside.

“If you know you have a difficult time during holidays, plan outings once or twice a week with people who make you feel happy,” says Gluck. “If it’s in your best interest, also feel okay about declining invitations without feeling guilty.”

Support your family and friends, too. Encourage them to eat healthy during celebrations and throughout the year. If you’re serving dinner, consider baking, broiling, or grilling food instead of frying. Replace sour cream with Greek yogurt, and mashed potatoes with mashed cauliflower. Make take-home containers available ahead of time, so guests don’t feel they have to eat everything in one sitting.

Article by NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Vicki Contie
Contributors: Erin Calhoun, Vicki Contie, Alan Defibaugh (illustrations), Bonnie Tabasko, and Carol Torgan

Belle of Amherst at Amelia Musical Playhouse

Back by popular demand, and benefitting Friends of the Library’s Capital Campaign, don’t miss this rare opportunity to see Sinda Nichols in her “masterful performance” as Emily Dickinson in “The Belle of Amherst” on January 6 & 7 at 7:30 p.m. at Amelia Musical Playhouse and January 8 at 4:00 p.m.

Find out why Emily proclaimed, “Take all away from me, but leave me ecstasy!” Ms. Nichols first performed, “The Belle of Amherst” in December 2010, and has toured the show at multiple theaters in and around the First Coast, the United States and in Ireland. Frequently her performances have benefited local Friends of the Library in honor of Emily Dickinson’s extraordinary contribution to literature.

Wherever Ms. Nichols performs, audiences have one thing to say about her “energizing and uplifting” performance as Emily Dickinson, “Don’t miss it! Do whatever you have to do to see it!” Her “spellbinding performance” takes the audience on an unforgettable journey over 40 years. Bursting with humor, wisdom and enormous energy, “The Belle of Amherst” reveals the many secrets of our most enigmatic poet. Ms. Nichols brings not only Emily to life, but also over a dozen of the poet’s family, friends and loves. This “exquisitely intelligent” performance leaves the audience, “seduced, captivated and uplifted.”

William Luce’s extraordinary play weaving together letters and poems won Julie Harris a Tony Award in 1977. Unique and intimate, this play invites the audience into the home of Emily Dickinson’s parlor as she lifts the veil on the greatest joys and deepest sorrows of her life.

Tickets are available online at www.ameliamusicalplayhouse.com or by phoning 904-277-3455.

Artists Needed for Leave No Trace Ordinance

AMELIA ISLAND, FL – The Nassau County Tourism Development Council (TDC) in Northeast Florida is seeking artists to submit proposals for a public art installation to complement the county’s “Leave No Trace” ordinance. Six large-scale outdoor sculptures will be created and placed at beach access points on Amelia Island, each incorporating manmade and naturally occurring debris washed ashore during Hurricane Matthew. The sculptures are intended to draw attention to the county’s Leave No Trace ordinance, which protects the safety and quality of the island’s beaches. The deadline to submit proposals is Jan. 9, 2017. Submission guidelines can be found at www.ameliaisland.com/sculptures.

“This is a creative way to emphasize the importance of preserving the natural beauty of our beaches for visitors and residents alike,” said Leigh Palmer, Director of Strategic Initiatives for the Amelia Island Convention and Visitors Bureau. “When completed, these sculptures will give beachgoers – and art lovers – a reason to stop and think about their individual responsibility to our local environment, while also encouraging them to read about the Leave No Trace ordinance.”

The TDC is encouraging proposals for the Seaside Sculptures project from all artists. Initial proposals are due Jan. 9, 2017, and should be for finished, large-scale outdoor sculptures with sustaining mediums incorporating a minimum of 25% repurposed beach debris. A jury of members from the Island Art Association will select up to six finalists on Jan. 20, 2017. Installations are scheduled for April 2017 and will take place at North Beach, Main Beach, Seaside Beach, Peter’s Point, Scott Road and Burney Park beach accesses.

For more information about the Seaside Sculptures project, including timeline, terms and conditions, eligibility, submission guidelines and more, visit www.ameliaisland.com/sculptures.  

Island Chamber Singers Fall 2016 Concert

Island Chamber Singers are presenting a fall concert “Happy Feast Day, Saint Cecilia” on Friday November 18, 7:00 PM, and again on Sunday, November 20, at 3:00 PM.

The concert will be held at the Amelia Plantation Chapel and tickets are available at the door for $25.00, or $20 in advance.

Students in K-12 and college students are admitted FREE!

First Aid for High Risk Writing

Excellent editing may do more than save your book from the dust bin. It carries the possibility of projecting your work to first-class acclaim. On November 17, at 6:00 p.m., all local writers are invited to join in as Writers by the Sea presents First Aid for High Risk Writing, by Heather Whitaker. Her approach to the editing process is not limited to improving your manuscript and increasing its chances of success, she also helps her clients become better writers along the way.

Beginning at 6:00 p.m., at the Amelia Island Museum of History, announcements and introductions will be facilitated by Donna Jennings, whose newly-released book will also be available to look at.

BIO: Heather Whitaker is a developmental editor and writing coach specializing in novels and memoirs, including children’s literature, adult literary, and adult genre fiction. She has worked with over 150 writers across the nation, from budding novelists to award-winning and NYT best-selling authors, Julianna Baggott (The PURE trilogy), J.C.Quinn (THE INFINITY OF YOU & ME), Jon Jefferson (CUT TO THE BONE, THE BREAKING POINT), and Laura Lascarso (COUNTING BACKWARDS, RACING HEARTS). In addition to manuscript editing, Heather leads ongoing writers groups and teaches writing classes for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at FSU.

Learn more about her at www.heatherwhitaker.com

FSCJ Sponsors JaxbyJax Literary Arts Festival

Jacksonville, FL – JaxbyJax, Jacksonville Writers Writing Jacksonville, the annual literary arts festival sponsored by Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ), will re-introduce the city of Jacksonville to its own literary voice when it returns on November 12, 2016. The event features 25 local writers in 12 venues across Riverside to showcase the city’s own thriving writing scene.

Guests are invited to choose their own adventure at their leisure as they wander from venue to venue enjoying the works of local playwrights, poets and novelists, which include faculty and staff of FSCJ.

Writers participating in JaxbyJax 2016 include:
Jim Alabiso
Tricia Booker
RaeJeana Brooks
Fred Dale
Frances Driscoll
Bill Ectric
Katherine Espano
Joe Flowers
Sohrab Fracis
Liz Gibson
Tim Gilmore
Nan Kavanaugh
Grant Kittrell
Matt Lany
Johnny Masiulewicz
Emily K. Michael
Marcus Pactor
Ebony Payne-English
Heather Peters
Andres Rojas
Caleb Sarvis
Sean T. Smith
Mark Stewart
Marisella Veiga
Jeff Whipple

For more information on JaxbyJax, visit jaxbyjax.com or contact Tim Gilmore, FSCJ professor of English, at (904) 616-3884.

WHEN/WHERE: Saturday, November 12, 2016, from 2 – 9 p.m.
Student Showcase: 2 p.m.

Readings of featured writers: 3 – 6 p.m.
Beer:30
Flaire Celebrations
Il Desco Italian Restaurant
Jacksonville Magazine
Riverside Liquors
Silver Cow Watering Hole
Sunday Tattoo Gallery
The Mazer
True-Blue Hair Studio
Whiteway Conference Room

After Party and Book Signing ($10): 6:30 p.m.

Storm and Yard Debris Pickup Information

In order to receive financial reimbursement, it was necessary for the City to activate a pre-positioned contract with a FEMA-approved debris management company, Ceres. Hurricane Matthew storm debris clean-up began on October 12. Since then, normal yard debris pick-up by Advanced Disposal has been postponed until at least one complete tour was done by Ceres.

The first tour will be completed by Saturday, November 5, 2016. A second tour by Ceres through the City limits will start on Monday, November 7.

Advanced Disposal will also resume the normal scheduled route for yard debris collection on Monday, November 7, as well. So far, over 1,600 tons of storm debris material has been removed following Hurricane Matthew.

Thank you for patience and assistance in making this clean-up a success.

2nd Annual Hit the Pin for Literacy Golf Scramble

cbc-hit-for-literacy2016-2

Photo: CBC National Bank is the Platinum Sponsor of this year’s “Hit the Pin for Literacy” Amelia Island Book Festival’s Golf Scramble. All the CBC National Bank employees at the local branch are “chipping” in. Recently, they held their monthly “jeans” day and raised $700 for Authors in Schools.

CBC is Major Sponsor of “Hit the Pin for Literacy” Amelia Island Book Festival’s 2nd Annual Charity Golf Scramble to Buy Books for Authors in Schools Literacy Program

Fernandina Beach, FL – “Literacy is vital at all levels of society and is the bedrock upon which communities like ours is built,” said Charles Wagner, President of CBC National Bank. “Celebrating and cultivating literacy by reaching every student in the Nassau County Public School System through this sponsorship is both a duty and an honor for our bank. The Authors in Schools Literacy Program is so effective and meaningful because it not only provides a free book to every student in Nassau County, it makes a personal connection to literacy for them through the interactions with the noted authors who meet the kids while delivering their books.”

This is Amelia Island Book Festival’s (AIBF) 2nd Annual Hit the Pin for Literacy Charity Golf Scramble supporting the Authors in Schools Literacy Program.

The setting is the beautiful, award winning, Omni Oak Marsh Golf Course, Friday, November 11, 2016, Veteran’s Day. Check-in starts at 11 am. After a special salute to our veterans, tee-off for the Shotgun Scramble format will be at noon.

“We are grateful to CBC national Bank for their support. The Bank’s corporate citizenship and community involvement is phenomenal. They not only donate, but they pitch in in every way they can. We urge all golfers of every handicap and those who haven’t played in a while to join in honoring our veterans while supporting our students. Aside from playing golf on a fabulous course enhanced by food and great prizes, there is tremendous satisfaction in knowing you are supporting literacy in our Nassau County Public Schools. That’s truly the top prize,” says, Fran Shea, AIBF Treasurer.

Board director Mary Jane Johnson says, “Everything from playing in the event to sponsoring a hole or becoming a major sponsor benefits our County’s students. The event is among several each year the AIBF puts on including a Murder Mystery Dinner, a kick-off luncheon featuring David Baldacci, ‘Lessons from a bestseller’ Writers Workshop with Steve Berry, and our Author Face-off Gala with live auction featuring a panel of NYT bestselling authors: R.L. Stine, Steve Berry, Mary Kay Andrews, Joseph Finder and Lara Adrian and more) all to raise the funds to bring an author and buy a book for every student in our Nassau County Public School System. Golfers are playing for a good cause, and having a great time in the process.”

“Our literacy program has been touching each of the 11,000 plus students in the county’s public schools for more than a decade,” says Marie Fenn, AIBF president. Just recently, our media specialists selected some fabulous children and young adult authors from an extensive list of applicants who responded to the Festival’s call. These select and noted authors are coming to present, entertain, and excite the kids about learning through books on Festival Friday, Feb. 17, 2017 at their schools.

“In addition to the wonderful cast of authors, the Festival has the privilege of having R. L. Stine, a world renowned icon in children and youth books. He will present to all the fourth grades in the county. This is super exciting for both the educators and the students,” she adds.

“Come spend a relaxing day out in the fresh air-in friendly competition, while affording a local student a unique life-long learning experience,” added Fran Shea.

The tournament format is a scramble with lots of interesting twists. There will be a putting contest, a ‘kick, throw and mulligan’ package, gifts, prizes, raffles and much more. Registration includes greens fees, carts, range balls, cart baggie, buffet & awards. Prizes will be awarded to the Top Three Teams. Buy tickets on line or by mail. Registration for a foursome is $500, which buys books for one classroom; an individual player’s cost is $150, which contributes to the purchase of books for approximately ten students. A portion of the registration fee is tax-deductible.

To buy tickets for the Hit the Pin for Literacy Golf Scramble, our other community events, and to learn more about all the benefits AIBF affords Nassau County 15 public schools, visit www.ameliaislandbookfestival.org

The 16th Annual Amelia Island Book Festival promises excitement and delight for book fans and readers of every age!

The Amelia Island Book Festival is a not for profit 501(c)3 Corporation seeking to open up the world for people of all ages by promoting and celebrating literacy through books. With a mission to promote life-long learning through fostering an appreciation for books, we provide quality events featuring authors in engaging venues.

College Goal Sunday Makes Transition to College Easier

Jacksonville, FL – Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ), in partnership with the University of North Florida, Edward Waters College, Duval County Public Schools, the Nassau County School District, Year Up Jacksonville and RealSense, a United Way-led coalition, is hosting College Goal Sunday, a free event that helps college-bound students and their parents or guardians complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form.

College Goal Sunday takes place Sunday, November 6, 2016, from 1-4 p.m. at both the FSCJ Advanced Technology Center, located on FSCJ Downtown Campus, and the FSCJ Betty P. Cook Nassau Center.

This annual event provides free, in-person, financial aid guidance to help students and parents prepare for a smooth transition from high school to college. Students who attend College Goal Sunday also have the opportunity to enter for a chance toreceive scholarship money. Participating colleges and universities are giving away more than $20,000 in scholarships.

The addresses for each location are listed below:

FSCJ Advanced Technology Center
(next to Downtown Campus, between Pearl and Broad streets)
401 W. State Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202

FSCJ Betty P. Cook Nassau Center
(just east of I-95 off of SR A1A)
76346 William Burgess Blvd., Yulee, FL 32097

Professional financial aid staff and counselors will be on hand at both locations to offer free help in all aspects of the application process. In order to complete the FAFSA, parents and students should bring the following:
 
*Social Security number, driver’s license or alien registration card
*2015 IRS 1040 or latest tax return and W-2 statements
*Federal Student Aid ID (Don’t have one? Create one at fsaid.ed.gov.)

For more information, visit http://www.collegegoalsundayfl.org.