FSCJ Hosts Role Models, a Ceramic Art Exhibit

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) invites students and members of the public to attend the traveling exhibition “Role Models” in August and September.

WHAT: “Role Models” is a survey of contemporary ceramics, with each artist showing one exemplary piece. The exhibit offers a range of exciting examples in sculptural and functional clay work. Organized by the Morean Arts Center and Florida CraftArt in St. Petersburg, the exhibit features 45 ceramic works representing the exciting range of sculptural and functional clay works being created by contemporary artists in Florida and beyond.

This exhibit offers students a unique opportunity to see the lineage of prominent contemporary ceramic artists and to witness firsthand the ways in which technique and aesthetics are passed from professionals to generations of students, affecting not only the personal work of an individual but entire trends within the medium. “Role Models” recently returned from exhibition at the prestigious National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA), the world’s largest all-ceramics conference.

Seventeen artists currently working in Florida were selected to participate in “Role Models.” Each artist was asked to choose one person who mentored them and another person whom they have mentored. Many of the artists have chosen craftspeople from elsewhere in the country – people they studied under in school, look to for professional advice or artists they have mentored who have moved on to successful out-of-state careers.

“Role Models” fits into a larger schedule of events and exhibits in September called “Ceramics JAX.” Organized by University of North Florida (UNF) Professor Stephen Heywood, “Ceramics JAX” will highlight the ceramic arts through a variety of exhibits, workshops and lectures. In addition to these exhibits, guest artist McKenzie Smith and others will present workshops and gallery talks throughout the month of September.

For images and more on the “Role Models” exhibition, visit rolemodelsshow.wordpress.com.

WHEN/WHERE: “Ceramics JAX” Exhibit and Event Dates

“Role Models”
Florida State College at Jacksonville-South Gallery, M1110
11901 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32246
August 24 – September 22, 2016
Reception: September 22, 2016, 5 – 7:30 p.m.

“National Juried Exhibition”
University of North Florida-UNF Gallery
1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224
September 1 – October 14, 2016
Reception: September 1, 2016

“Wood Fire Invitational”
University of North Florida-Lufrano Gallery
1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224
September 1 – November 15, 2016
Reception: September 1, 2016

MOCA Jacksonville
333 North Laura St., Jacksonville, FL 32202
August 30 – November 21, 2016
Reception: September 7, 2016

Sculptural Narrative
Cathedral Arts Project (organized by Jacksonville University)
207 North Laura St. Suite 300, Jacksonville, FL 32202
September 7 – December 15, 2016
Reception: September 7, 2016

“Student Exhibit”
CoRK Arts District
Dates: TBA
Reception: September 16, 2016

Lecture: McKenzie Smith
University of North Florida-Ceramics Studio
1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224
September 6, 2016

Workshop: McKenzie Smith
University of North Florida-Ceramics Studio
1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224
September 7 – 8, 2016

When will we see Warning Labels on Processed Meats?


When I was diagnosed with colon cancer less than a year ago, I thought it would be a good idea to immediately stop eating processed meats. As a kid who grew up on bologna sandwiches, Vienna sausages, and summer sausage, it was much easier to give up than I thought. A few years ago, we gave up fast foods, TV dinners, and most canned vegetables in an attempt to lose weight and eat healthy. When I began managing the local farmers market in September 2012, eating fresh, local and seasonal produce became second nature. Apparently, our changes in diet didn’t come soon enough for me.

Processed meat
In October 2015, the month after my diagnosis, the media reported that processed meat was classified as Group 1, carcinogenic to humans. Tobacco smoking and asbestos are also placed in this same class. Group 1 classification means there is sufficient and convincing evidence that the agent causes cancer.

So, why is there not a warning label on our lunch meat, hot dogs, canned meats, corned beef, and ham? Other meats are included, too, such as meats that have been transformed through processing ie: curing, salting, fermentation, smoking etc… they are all considered “processed meat”.

Red meat
Red meat is now classified as Group 2A – this means it is probably carcinogenic to humans. Health officials have long been telling the public to reduce their red meat consumption for a variety of health concerns, but now they suspect that red meat probably causes cancer, too?

If the World Health Organization says red meat probably causes cancer, and processed meats do cause cancer, I think there should be a warning label on these packages just like we see on cigarettes.

What if we just cook the Hell out of our meats, will that make it okay to eat? Nope – in fact, if you expose your meats to flame and high temperatures, it may even increase the risk – but the factual evidence leaves the experts with mixed opinions on that topic.

At the risk of repeating myself, please let me be perfectly clear, the World Health Organization says that epidemiological studies have shown eating processed meat causes colorectal cancer in humans. Period! Yet, they hesitate to make new recommendations regarding nutritional guidelines. The current recommendation is to moderate consumption of processed meats mostly to reduce the intake of fat and sodium, which are risk factors for obesity and cardiovascular disease. New guidelines aren’t expected until 2021!

Your risk of getting colorectal cancer increases with the amount of processed meats you consume. “An analysis of data from 10 studies estimated that every 50 gram portion of processed meat eaten daily increases the risk of colorectal cancer by about 18%.”

Well, how much is a serving compared to a 50 gram portion? A serving size of beef, considered to be 2 to 3 ounces of cooked, lean meat, by the American Heart Association, equals 75 grams, which is more than the 50 gram portion described above… not good news, huh?

In a January 2016 interview, Syndicated Columnist and Investigative Reporter Amy Goodman (host of Democracy Now!) reported, “Dr. Richard Wender, chief cancer control officer of the American Cancer Society, recently commented ‘The science on the link between cancer and diet is extensive. By omitting specific diet recommendations, such as eating less red and processed meat, these guidelines miss a critical and significant opportunity to reduce suffering and death from cancer.'”

Personally, I want anyone who reads this to know, I had colon cancer, and I remember very specifically saying, “I wouldn’t wish this on my worst enemy.” It was a horrible experience!

Some are even blaming the Obama administration for keeping this issue out of the spotlight. While many of the lobby donations to candidates have been to republicans, the highest presidential recipient, from meat processing and products donations, has been to Hillary Clinton.

Should you stop eating processed meats? Red meats? That is your decision, but I won’t wait for the government to publish new nutritional guidelines before I choose what to feed to my family.

Farmers Market Vendors Stay Busy All Year

Summer feels like it is coming to a close with the neighborhood children returning to school, but activity at the farmers market in Fernandina Beach continues at full pace. Each week, the amazing vendors of the Market Place continue to expand, enhance, and strengthen their product lines. Here are a few recent updates:

-Cross Creek Honey has recently included a fresh batch of honeycomb that is absolutely beautiful!
-Amelia Pasta, has returned to the farmers market on a weekly basis. Their fettuccine, linguini, penne and orzo are made with real vegetables and hand milled spices. Naturally low on the glycemic index, these pastas have no artificial ingredients and no fillers. When you stop by their booth, be sure to ask about their frequent shoppers card.
-Bottega by Liz Grenamyer is a popular catering company and their new slogan is “prepared meals with style”. They attend the farmers market every Saturday and also offer delicious dips and crackers such as their Kentucky cucumber dip served on a crunchy crostini.
-Olive My Pickle, a long time vendor at the Market Place, has introduced a fermented radish and red ginger sauerkraut to compliment their line of pickles, hummus, and olives. Owners Shai and Charlotte are on a mission to spread awareness about gut health and they truly enjoy sharing their raw-food products that are naturally full of bio-available nutrients and enzymes, live cultures, and pro-biotics.

Whether you come to the Market Place every Saturday, or you haven’t been down in awhile, we invite you to join us on North Seventh Street in historic Fernandina Beach, Florida, every Saturday of the year. We are open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m, rain or shine. This week brings the return of about 20 arts and craft booths in the adjacent Fernandina Beach Arts Market, and our musician is Jen Burns. Market sponsor, All American Gutter, will be joining us weekly for the remainder of 2016.

Friends of the Library Presents The Art of the Japanese Print

Friends of the Library Presents The Art of the Japanese PrintFriends of the Fernandina Beach Library (FOL) invites the entire community to a Meet and Greet reception to view the new exquisite art exhibition titled “The Art of the Japanese Print” at the Fernandina Beach Branch of the Nassau County Library. The reception, which offers coffee and refreshments, will be held from 10 am to 12 pm, September 10th in the new Community Room at the Library, located at 25 North 4th Street.

Christine and Paul Meehan are graciously loaning a portion of their collection of contemporary Japanese prints to Friends of the Library for an exhibition from September 1st to December 30th as part of the Library’s new revolving quarterly community art exhibits.

The Meehan collection, initiated in 1975, was previously exhibited at the Morikami Museum in Delray Beach, Florida, and exemplifies all the major printmaking techniques in use today including woodblock, intaglio, planographic/lithography and stencil/silkscreen, providing a wonderful opportunity for residents and students in our area.

During the reception, FOL will acknowledge a most generous contribution from the Rotary Club of Amelia Island Sunrise. The group raised funds during its Fourth Annual Wine & Food Tasting. The proceeds of which will benefit computer literacy through its strong support for the new Technology Center at the Fernandina Beach Library Branch.

For more information regarding the Friends of the Library or to make a donation, please visit www.FernandinaFOL.org.

Mark Kaufman and Donna Paz Kaufman Present to Rotary

Mark Kaufman and Donna Paz Kaufman Present to RotaryMark Kaufman and Donna Paz Kaufman were recent guests of The Rotary Club of Amelia Island Sunrise and gave a presentation on the future of retail bookstores.

Their company, Paz and Associates – The Bookstore Training Group, helps booksellers develop knowledge and skills to successfully operate profitable, independent bookstores.

In addition to helping them in their operations, they can help with store design, layout, lighting and all aspects of effective marketing. They also have expertise in cafe operations, which is becoming a common feature of bookstores.

Mark and Donna stated that the independent bookstore industry is healthy and growing. Rotarians found the presentation interesting and informative.

Rotary is an international service organization with over 34,000 clubs world-wide. The Amelia Island Sunrise Club meets Fridays at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club at 7:30 a.m.

Voting, Politicians, and the Salaries they Get Paid

Voting, Politicians, and the Salaries they Get PaidYou know it is election time because everywhere you look it is shoved in your face. From yard signs and bumper stickers, to billboards and television commercials, you just can’t escape the “noise”.

I vote, I have always voted, and God willing, I will always be capable of voting – it is my right and I choose to believe my vote counts!

Sorting out the options to select a candidate takes a little research on my part. I want to be confident that I’m selecting the names that best reflect my views. When I choose a candidate, I hope to select a leader – not someone who hops on this bandwagon, or that bandwagon, I am voting for “leaders” to help “lead” MY country in the best direction.

I will be voting in person, at my precinct, on August 30th, so I don’t have a lot of time to finish making my decisions.

Typically, I do not vote for the professional politicians. If you live the lifestyle of a politician for too long, how can you still relate to the “common” folk?

According to a document found on senate.gov, “The most recent pay adjustment for Members of Congress was in January 2009. Since then, the compensation for most Senators, Representatives, Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico has been $174,000.” The salary for a few others, Speaker of the House and House Leaders, for example, is higher. Representatives also receive a Members’ Representational Allowance (MRA) to support their official duties such as $944,671 for personnel, a variable amount of official office expenses, and official mail. “The 2014 allowances ranged from $1,195,554 to $1,370,009, with an average MRA of $1,255,909.” The same document stated.

When we vote, we often times are electing someone to receive one hell of a paycheck!

Local level politicians are paid using a state mandated formula, based on the relevant population of their district, to calculate salaries. Florida’s elected officials and full-time members of commissions have set salaries ranging from $45,000 for Public Employees Relations Commission Commissioners, to $130,000 for the Governor.

Take a look at this chart… (click on the image to enlarge it) no wonder we have professional politicians! (Some salary figures may not reflect any special qualification salary available or performance salary incentives. That research is above MY pay-grade.)


Click the image to enlarge

When I am selecting candidates to vote for on a local level, I find it amusing to look at the relationships between the politicians; past, present and potentially future. Some connections are obvious like Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper and his brother Danny Leeper who is running for County Commission. Others, are not so obvious, but maybe I’ll save that for another article.

Please vote on August 30, 2016, but take the time to learn about each candidate before you cast your ballot; I know I will!

Learn How to Participate in Dickens on Centre 2016

Santa Claus vacationed on Amelia Island this year and has plans to return for the 2nd Annual Dickens on Centre. Check out his vacation video by clicking HERE.

If you are interested in participating in Dickens on Centre this year, please mark your calendar and come to the Historic Fernandina Business Association’s Dickens on Centre Merchant Meeting on Friday, August 26th at 10:30 a.m, in the City Hall commission chambers.

After the success of the inaugural Dickens on Centre festival, the Amelia Island Convention and Visitors Board is diligently making plans for the second annual Victorian holiday festival in downtown Fernandina. Attend on August 26th to learn more about this year’s plans and how you can get involved in this festive community event.

The event is already already promoting the holidays on Amelia Island throughout the southeast with some extra help of a special visitor:

Save the Date for Dickens on Centre 2016
· Kicks off Thursday, December 8th with America’s Youth annual lighted Christmas parade
· Festival held Friday, December 9th – Sunday, December 11 (Just one weekend this year)

Join us at the merchant meeting to learn more about:
· Site plan, street closures and event schedule
· Vendor opportunities
· Décor, lighting and entertainment plans
· Ways for your business to get involved
· Promotional plans for Dickens on Centre and Amelia Island holiday events

As we may not have contact information for everyone that may be interested, please feel free to invite other businesses that may have an interest in this informative meeting about Dickens on Centre.

Carvalho’s Journey Presented at Fernandina Library

Carvalho’s Journey
The year was 1853 when famed explorer John Fremont organized his fifth, and final, expedition across the American West. Solomon Carvalho, a portrait painter who had never saddled his own horse, a Sephardic Jew and one of Americas first photographers, signed on for the gueling journey. He traveled with mountian men, pioneers, Native Americans, and Mormons, on this 2400 mile trip into the American West that would take more than a year to complete.

The entire crew faced many disasters, including waist high snow in mountains of Utah, sudden wild fires and starvation. Yet many of the beautiful vistas and images we know of the West are due to Carvalho’s photography.

Watch the film and be a part of the journey. The screening will be held August 25 at 6:00 p.m. at the Fernandina Beach Branch Library Community Room. An optional dinner will follow at 7:45 pm at Café Karibo.

Free tickets for the film, and dinner reservations, are now available at the Library. For further information please visit www.nassaureads.com or call (904) 277-7365.

This program is sponsored by Friends of the Fernandina Beach Library.

Clean Eating at the Farmers Market

Clean Eating at the Farmers MarketEating clean means eating good, local, and seasonal foods that nourish a healthy body. We’ve recently seen a variety of food movements including “The Paleo Diet”, “Farm to Table”, and “Field to Fork”, and while they have different details, they all have one common message inviting us to get back to eating foods the way nature intended.

Foods that are environmentally sustainable, natural, and grown in ways that treat animals and workers well, are gaining in popularity as more and more folks are demanding greater transparency from agricultural corporations to learn what we really are putting into our bodies.

We are learning that the soy and corn fields of yesterday introduced a plethora of new foods, boxed products, fast and convenient foods, processed foods, sweetened beverages, and meats infused with growth hormones and antibiotics. This way of feeding the masses became the “norm” and along with it we’ve seen a strong correlation to health problems such as obesity, type II diabetes, and high blood pressure. There have also been scandals such as mad cow disease and E.coli outbreaks that encouraged us to question how our food is being prepared.

Seasonal foods are grown naturally and require less interference. Land and labor are cheaper in foreign countries, making the price of an out of season product attractive, but purchasing off-season foods not only hurt the environment by using more fuel in shipping, but it also hurts the local economy by not purchasing from your neighbors. Farmers markets are a great way to get back to the basics. Local foods, grown in your backyard, your community, your state or your region, leave a smaller footprint on the environment.

The Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, open every Saturday on North Seventh Street in historic Fernandina Beach, offers a wide variety of locally grown, or prepared foods. Fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables are readily available, but they may look a little different than their grocery store counterparts. You won’t find the waxed cucumbers or the gassed oranges you may see in the big box stores where produce is mass distributed, and you may even find a bug or two instead of a thin coating of pesticides.

In Florida (and California), we have the majority of the “native-to-the-Americas” fruits and vegetables and our produce vendors have a nice supply of seasonal foods, year-round. Much of the produce is harvested on Fridays, right before the market. Our bakers are baking within hours of the market’s opening. The local shrimp is caught wild, and even the dog treat vendor offers the freshest possible treats for your best friend.

When you come to the farmers market, we invite you to look at the labels and ask open ended questions to learn more about the processes our producers and growers use. Our exhibitors love to talk about their products and they are a wealth of information; you may even learn your next favorite recipe!

We are open from 9:00 to 1:00, rain or shine. For more information, please visit FernandinaBeachMarketPlace.com.

Rotary Sunrise Has Been Very Busy this Summer

Rotary Sunrise Has Been Very Busy this SummerThe Rotary Club of Amelia Island Sunrise recently welcomed four new members.

Pictured (first image) from left to right are Dan and Regan Westra and Dr. Peter Williams along with club president Stan Fishburn. Dan was active in Rotary in North Carolina and Regan is starting a retail business here. Peter is a retired cardiologist.

Carolyn Byrd, who works with Amelia Urgent Care is pictured first, left to right, with Sandy Rogers of the Rotary District, Carolyn Byrd, Vicki Beaudry club membership chair and Stan Fishburn, in the second picture.

Another recent Rotary club of Amelia Island Sunrise activity was when Kim Bynum, with Operation New Uniform, recently gave a presentation on the non-profit organization. The Rotary Club of Amelia Island Sunrise recently welcomed four new members. It was started two years ago in Jacksonville when Justin Justice and several others recognized the need for a program to help military veterans and their families transition to civilian life and work.

Veterans are taught skills to help them grow within an organization. Their training program helps them with resumes, interviewing, job search, networking and related activities in job transitioning, and they literally get a new business suit “uniform” upon graduation. Operation New UniformOperation New Uniform enjoys a job placement success of over 90%. Rotarians found the presentation interesting and informative. Rotary is an international service organization with clubs in over 200 countries. The Amelia Island Sunrise Club meets Fridays at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club at 7:30.

Rotary is an international service organization with over 34,000 clubs world-wide. The Amelia Island Sunrise Club meets Fridays at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club at 7:30.

Learn More About Candidate Jonathan Petree

Learn More About Candidate Jonathan PetreeJonathan Petree, who is running for the Nassau County School Board from District 5, is in a tightly contested race and needs your vote. His election is an open election meaning that all registered Republicans/Democrats/Independents can vote for him.

Jonathan is the owner of Atlantic Warriors, a martial arts company in Jacksonville. Over the years he has come to Amelia Island and given classes to women only for self-defense. He is truly dedicated to doing the best possible job in this position, and with four children will be involved in our school system, for many years to come.

Jonathan, who comes from a family of educators, is a Nassau County native and married to Jessica Petree. He is focused on college readiness, supports vocational education, and believes in parents rights.

Early voting in Nassau County for Florida’s August 30 primary will be 10 am to 6 pm August 19-27. Registered voters may vote at any of four sites: Callahan County Building, 45401 Mickler St.; Hilliard Community Center, 37177 Pecan St.; James S. Page Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau Place, Yulee; and MLK/Elm Street Recreation Center, 1200 Elm St., Fernandina Beach.


2016 Fall Community Yard Sale

There is a “Fall Community Yard Sale” on October 1st, 2016, from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Atlantic Recreation Center
Auditorium and in the parking lot.

If you didn’t get to your “spring cleaning” – now is your chance! Clean out those closets, attics and the garage, and put the good stuff up for sale.

Indoor and outdoor booth spaces available for rental:
10 indoor spaces available – $40 each. Includes two 8′ banquet tables and five chairs.
35 outdoor spaces available – $15 each. Tables and chairs not included.

Visit the Atlantic Recreation Center to reserve booth space(s). Set-up will be from 6:00 to 8:00 a.m.


Psoriasis - Patches of Itchy, Sore SkinYou may have heard of psoriasis, but do you know what it is? Psoriasis is a long-term, or chronic, skin disorder that affects more than 6.7 million U.S. adults. Symptoms can vary, but it’s usually recognized by itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. There’s currently no cure, but treatment often helps.

Psoriasis occurs when skin cells quickly rise to the surface of the skin and build up into thick patches, or plaques. Ordinarily, skin cells mature as they rise from their origins below the surface of the skin. In psoriasis, these cells pile up before they’ve had a chance to properly mature.

Psoriasis actually begins in the immune system, which normally protects the body against infection and disease. In psoriasis, the immune system becomes misdirected and overactive. This can cause redness and swelling (inflammation) and lead to the rapid buildup of skin cells.

Plaques are most often found on the elbows, knees, or scalp. But they can also affect the face, fingernails, toenails, soft tissues of the genitals, or any skin-covered region.

“Patients can have a lot of symptoms like itching, cracking, and bleeding that can disrupt their sleep and their social relationships,” says Dr. Joel Gelfand, a skin specialist (dermatologist) at the University of Pennsylvania. People with moderate to severe psoriasis may feel self-conscious or have a poor self-image, which can lead to depression or social isolation.

Some people with psoriasis also experience joint inflammation that produces arthritis-like pain. This condition is called psoriatic arthritis. Gelfand and other NIH-supported researchers have found that psoriasis, especially severe psoriasis, is linked to certain other disorders as well, such as heart conditions, obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

Psoriasis can occur at any age, but it typically first appears in young adulthood. Many people with psoriasis have a family history of the disorder. Researchers have been able to identify certain genes linked to the disease, but they still don’t fully understand the disease process. They do know that it isn’t contagious. You can’t “catch” psoriasis by touching someone who has it.

Psoriasis can be hard to diagnose, because it can look like other skin diseases. Your doctor might need to look at a small skin sample under a microscope. It’s often best to make an appointment with a primary care doctor or a dermatologist to get an accurate diagnosis.

There are many approaches for treating psoriasis. Safe and proven treatment options include creams, light therapy, and medications given as pills or a shot.

“Treatment decisions in psoriasis need to be highly individualized and tailored toward the patient’s clinical condition and underlying health status, as well as their preferences and goals,” Gelfand says. Be sure to ask your doctor about the best treatment options for you.

Psoriasis symptoms may briefly worsen, or flare. These flares can arise when people are stressed or experience a traumatic event like the death of a family member or friend. Smoking, heavy alcohol use, and being overweight can also aggravate psoriasis.

Gelfand and other NIH-funded researchers have been working to develop better therapies. “It’s a great time to be hopeful and optimistic about this disease,” Gelfand says. “Most of the therapies coming out now seem to be well-tolerated and have impressive effectiveness.”

Article by NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Vicki Contie
Contributors: Vicki Contie, Alan Defibaugh (illustrations), Claire Donnelly, and Tianna Hicklin.

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