Visit Florida Visits Amelia Island to Fish

 Visit Florida Visits Amelia Island to FishVisit Florida is the state’s official tourism marketing company and it provides a ton of information to those visiting Florida. Tourism is one of Amelia Island’s biggest sectors, and many of the state’s attractions invest as Partners in advertising campaigns to generate more traffic for the industry.

Local resident and Charter Fishing Captain Russell Tharin took Visit Florida writer Terry Gibson on a dynamic and productive trip through the uncrowded salt marshes and shallow waters surrounding one of the best kept secrets in Northeast Florida, Fernandina Beach.

Check out the wonderful video produced when Terry went fishing with Captain Russ:

http://www.visitflorida.com/en-us/videos/2014/Insider-Amelia-Island-Offers-Some-of-Floridas-Best-Fishing.html

Just another reason to love Amelia Island, Florida!

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2014 Sponsorship, Donation and Vendor Opportunities

2014 Sponsorship, Donation and Vendor OpportunitiesThe Nassau Sport Fishing Association is looking for sponsors, donations and vendors for one of the four tournaments during the Kingfish Tournament and Fishing Rodeo to be held August 2, 2014.

There will be several prize drawings throughout the event beginning on Friday night, August 1st, along with a silent auction taking place on site Friday and Saturday. In addition there will be raffle ticket sales for several weeks in advance with a drawing held on Saturday night August 2nd as part of the awards ceremonies.

We would be very grateful for any level of sponsorship you would consider or any prize donation you could make.

The Nassau Sport Fishing Association, founded in 1983, is a 501c3 non profit organization, created to develop and promote salt water fishing in the Nassau County area while adhering to state, federal and local regulations, to encourage compliance with rules of water safety by club members and the general public, and to promote youth related community and other civic minded activities.

Any donation you make to NSFA is tax deductible to you or your company because of our 501c3 status we have been granted by the IRS.

For tax purposes we are considered a charitable educational organization.

If you would like to make a tax deductible donation of a silent auction item or raffle prize for this event just click on the link below.
2014 Donation Form

If you or your company would like to become a sponsor for this event just click on the link below. After discounting the amount of your sponsorship by any goods or services you would receive in exchange for being a sponsor, the remaining amount of your sponsorship would be considered tax deductible.
2014 Sponsor Form

To become an exhibitor at the tournament site on Friday and Saturday just click on the link below.
2014 Vendor Exhibitor Form

If you have any questions or concerns please contact us at info@nsfafish.net

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Consider Renting Fishing Equipment When on Vacation

Consider Renting Fishing Equipment When on VacationIf you are a fisherman and have planned a trip to a watery destination you may do well to consider renting your fishing equipment when you are on vacation.

Tackle to fit your fishing needs might be more than you want to deal with. If you need to carry coolers, fishing rods, tackle boxes and more, on an airplane it can be impossible, or even in a car it can be a challenge. Purchasing all those necessary items upon arrival at an unfamiliar place may prove expensive and time consuming.

Google has proven to be a useful tool to locate shops or individuals who provide outfitting services or more commonly called ”rod and reel rentals”.

If you lack internet when you are on your next vacation, check with the concierge service provided by resorts and hotels; ask the front desk of your motel, or a property manager, rental agent or simply call a local tackle shop.

Once you have located a rental business, price should be discussed as well as the type of tackle recommended for local fishing, bait availability, where to fish, deposits required, how damage to equipment or injury is handled, pick up and return policies and local fishing license requirements.

If you and your vacation partners are inexperienced anglers, ask if the rental person be willing to share local knowledge and possibly provide a brief tutorial on the care and use of the rental tackle.

Amelia Island is fast becoming a premier fishing destination and whether you bring your own tackle or rent – when you arrive I’ll be happy to help you find and catch fish.

Capt. Jim, Cleansweep Fishing Charters and Beach Fishing Rentals. For more information call (904) 753-0882 or visit www.ameliacharterfishing.com.

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Rotarians Learn How to Cast

Rotarians Learn How to CastOn Friday, March 7th, the Rotary Club of Amelia Island Sunrise was treated to lessons in fly casting from Captain Lawrence Piper of The Angler’s Mark.

Captain Piper has been providing fly fishing adventures on Amelia Island for over 7 years.

As a certified Fly Casting Instructor from the Federation of Fly Fishers, Captain Piper provides instruction on how to fine tune your casting technique and become a better fisherman!

In his presentation, Captain Piper talked about the 5 principles of casting:
-Eliminating slack in your line
-Acceleration of the fly rod
-Following a straight line with the rod tip
-Varying casting strokes
-Timed pauses

The Angler’s Mark offers tours of all the backwaters of Amelia Island with Captain Piper providing all the tackle and instruction needed to be a terrific fly fisherman.

Born and raised in Fernandina Beach, Captain Piper loves to share the history of the island and all the best fishing spots! For more information about Captain Piper and The Angler’s Mark, visit the website at www.TheAnglersMark.com.

The Rotary Club of Amelia Island Sunrise meets every Friday at 7:30 a.m. at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club. For more information about the club or to attend a morning breakfast meeting, please contact president, Mark Dennis, at mark@A1Awealthmanagement.com or go to www.ameliaislandrotary.com.

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2013 NSFA Fernandina Beach Fishing Rodeo

2013 NSFA Fernandina Beach Fishing RodeoIt is time for the 2013 NSFA Fernandina Beach Fishing Rodeo on Amelia Island! August 2 – 3, 2013 will show off the hard work the Rodeo Committee has been doing to put on this annual event.

Registration closes at 8:00 PM, August 2nd, so you still have time to participate. The mandatory Captain’s Meeting is Friday night at the Fernandina Harbor beginning at 7:00 PM.

The rules are simple:
No lines in the water until 6:30 am Saturday morning.
All fish must be weighed at the Fernandina Harbor.
No contact with other boats or both will be disqualified.

Fishing Rodeo Prizes (Redfish, Wahoo, Dolphin, Sea Trout, Flounder, Cobia, Sheepshead, and Sea Bass)
-1st Place per Species- $750
-2nd Place per Species- $450
-3rd Place per Species- $300

Kingfish Division Prizes (formerly Tournament of Champions)
-1st Place Overall – $10,000
-2nd Place Overall – $3,500
-3rd Place Overall – $2,500
-4th Place Overall – $2,000
-5th Place Overall – $1,500
-6th Place Overall – $1,000
-7th Place Overall – $850
-8th Place Overall – $750
-9th Place Overall – $600
-10th Place Overall – $500

Special prizes will also be awarded to Lady Angler, Youth Angler and Redfish with the Most Spots.

-Small Boat Class: 1st Prize- $1,300; 2nd Prize- $450
-Youth Angler: 1st Prize- $1,200; 2nd Prize- $400
-Lady Angler: 1st Prize- $1,100; 2nd Prize- $350

This is a SKA sanctioned event!

Here is the schedule of events:
Friday, August 2, 2013
5:00 pm – Registration Opens
5:00-8:00 pm – Public Barbeque
7:00 pm – Captain’s Meeting & Boat Number Prize Drawing
6:00-8:00 pm – Sounds on Centre
8:00 pm – Registration Closes

Saturday, August 3, 2013
6:30 am – Fishing Opens
2:00 pm – Weigh-in Opens
5:00 pm – Weigh-in Line Closes
5:00 pm – Public Barbeque with Live Entertainment by Flashback
7:30 pm – Awards and Raffles

New this year is a catch-photo-release option for Kayaking anglers!

For more information please visit the Nassau Sport Fishing Association’s website at fishnsfa.com.

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Fernandina Kids’ Fishing Clinic

Fernandina Kids' Fishing ClinicFort Clinch is home to the Fernandina Kids’ Fishing Clinic for March 9, 2013.

Kids’ Fishing Clinics are one-day educational events established by the Outreach and Education section of the Division of Marine Fisheries Management, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

One of the main goals for the Kids’ Fishing Clinics is to create responsible marine resource stewards by teaching children the vulnerability of Florida’s marine ecosystems.

In addition, we hope to teach fundamental saltwater fishing skills and to provide kids with a positive fishing experience.

At the clinics, the children go through five mandatory skill stations: Casting, Knot Tying, Fishing Tackle, Good Angler and Touch Tank. After approximately one hour of instruction, the children will receive a free rod and reel (compliments of local sponsors while supplies last), and at most clinics, will have the opportunity to fish.

Since 1996, more than 52,000 children and 43,000 parents have participated in our Kids’ Fishing Clinics. None of this would have been possible without the 10,000 volunteers who have come out to assist in educating these young anglers about fishing techniques, marine habitats, ethical angling and conservation.

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30th Annual Kingfish Tournament and Fishing Rodeo

30th Annual Kingfish Tournament and Fishing RodeoIt is time for the Nassau Sport Fishing Association’s 30th Annual Fishing Rodeo and Kingfish Tournament!

Come to the foot of Centre Street in Fernandina Beach to catch the excitement.

August 3, 2012
Registration hours: 5:00 to 8:00 PM
Captain’s Meeting Time: 7:00 PM

    -The Captain’s Meeting will include a public barbeque; beer, water, sport’s drinks, and soda will be available for purchase.
    -Tournament T-shirts and hats will be offered for sale.
    -Raffle tickets will be available for Awards Dinner raffle on Saturday. Winner need not be present to win.

August 4, 2012
Fishing Hours: 6:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Weigh-in: 2:00 to 5:00 PM
Award’s Dinner & Music by Flashback: 5:00 to 8:00 PM
Awards/Raffle: 7:30 PM

Nassau Sport Fishing Association is a 501c3 charity. Proceeds benefit educational programming, college scholarships, youth programming, reef development, and more.

For more information and a listing of the prize structure, please visit the website at www.fishnsfa.com.

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Cobia Come Early to Amelia Island

Cobia Come Early to Amelia IslandOur fishing party cleared the jetties off Amelia Island, Florida, around 11:00 am. Celebrating Luke’s birhtday, we were greeted by calm seas, sunny skies and high hopes of catching some really big fish! Fishing reports from the previous day included news of a 62 pound cobia that was caught at the South St. Marys jetties and it prompted us to carefully inspect each bouy marker all the way to the STM sea bouy. No cobia were found and a short ride later we were soaking squid and cut mullet at FB reef.

Immediately upon hitting the bottom of the sea floor, our baits were inhaled by hungry black sea bass. We were reeling them in two at a time! Every drop produced large seabass. Luke’s father alone caught at least 40! I had some live mullet in the baitwell and I pinned one to one of Luke’s hooks in hopes of digging a grouper from the natural structure 65 feet below. As I was unhooking a seabass from another anglers rig Luke shouted that he had a big fish and was struggling mightily to bring it up. When the fish finally made it to the boat I scooped it up with the dipnet and admired Lukes 18 lb. gag grouper. With sore arms he and his fellow anglers continued to catch seabass for several hours.

Another highlight was a pair of giant sunfish cruising past the Cleansweep boat.

On our return to Amelia we inspected the first set of bouys and discovered a cobia lazing next to a barracuda in the shadow of bouy #2. I tossed a live mullet in his general direction and he gulped it down in seconds, setting the hook. He ran around the bow of the boat and swam on the surface unphased then bolted toward the bottom in the direction of the bouy anchor chain. I applied a little too much pressure in order to avoid the chain, and with my jigging rod bent double and the drag singing, the knot between the flourocarbon leader and the braided line failed under the strain. We all gasped as the rod straightened and our estimated 60 lb. cobia disappeared into the murky depths.

The day was not lost as we caught fish all day and spent another great day fishing the waters off Amelia Island!

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Lofton Creek Striper Boats Happy Fisherman

Lofton Creek Striper Boats Happy FishermanA fishing holiday was in order for my old buddy, Jody Moyer. He was visiting from his home in Indiana and we hadn’t fished the waters of Lofton creek together in many years.

We had filled the bait well with large wild shiners from my lake the previous night and they were frisky and ready to fish. As we launched the Cleansweep boat at the A1A ramp the last third of the outgoing tide greeted us along with a log jam which we wiggled over and around. We motored down the winding creek past mossy trees and a scattering of houses and docks to a creek mouth aptly dubbed the “Hog Hole”.

After anchoring we flipped our live shiners, pinned to a 1/0 wide gap hook with a cigar shaped foam float, up to the muddy bank’s edge. Just as one shiner began patrolling the bank, a huge splash indicated a sizeble bass had struck, but the hook missed its mark and the fish devoured a free meal. Another shiner was pitched in the same vicinity and quickly inhaled. Jody set the hook and worked a four pound bass to the boat for a picture. My turn was next and my live bait was quickly smashed up against the muddy bank. As the fish headed for deeper water I set the hook causing an eruption on the surface and as I battled the largemouth to the boat it appeared to be sizable. When finally netted, it weighed six pounds.

Next, Jody set the hook on another hard fighting fish which when brought to the net surprised us with the lateral lines of a striper. Stripers can be caught in our Nassau County brackish tributaries in the winter and spring months. As the tide slowed, we prepared to move back upstream where the tidal flow would still be going out. Jody’s float disappeared! After a solid hook set and a deeply bent spinning rod, a blue catfish surfaced weighing in at six pounds.

We pulled anchor and headed upstream toward the boat ramp and caught two more nice largemouth bass before calling it a day. All fish were released into my lake unharmed to suppliment a fish population decimated by a fish kill last October… with the exception of the striper whose filets wound up being baked under a layer of mayo, cracker crumbs and spices.

Bass are active during all tidal phases in Lofton creek, moving water being the key. Check out Lofton. It is not crowded and loaded with natural beauty.

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Triathlon Adds to Congestion on Amelia Island

Triathlon Adds to Congestion on Amelia IslandWith the SunSplash Music Festival and the NSFA’s Fishing Rodeo being held the same weekend, the Jacksonville Sprint Series Mini Triathlon held on August 6th will add to the congestion on Amelia Island this weekend.

This race is limited to 600 athletes and begins at 7:30 in the morning at Main Beach in Fernandina. Included is a 1/4 mile swim in the Atlantic Ocean, a 16 (on their website) or 17 (on their logo) mile bike ride along the coast and a three mile run through communities surrounding North Fletcher Avenue.

The Awards Ceremony is at 9:45 AM so there is plenty of time to catch all of the events on Amelia Island this weekend! For more information visit www.drcsports.com/RACES/jax3.shtml.

Amelia Island Redfish, Shallow Water Brawlers

Amelia Island Redfish, Shallow Water BrawlersOur party of three anglers patiently waited for me to castnet a baitwell of live pogys which are schooling up in the backwater creeks; due to the lack of rain, I presume. One cast produced enough small pogys, just right for large seatrout, flounder, sharks and big reds.

We tried several usually productive spots with no luck. The tide was dead low and no tidal movement usually means slow fishing. Moving to another sandbar, an oyster bed area, the tide eased in bringing with it clear water. We could see bonnethead and sandsharks as they cruised over the sandy bottom. Live pogys were pitched to them and they obliged, providing some rod bending action on our 12 lb. spinning tackle. As the tide rose, I suggested another oyster strewn area with a deep drop off adjacent to it.

image – amelia-island-redfish

We drifted our live pogys along the oyster covered banks without success. Then just as we were ready to call it a day, Tyler, one of our shark catching experts aboard the CleanSweep boat had been soaking a bait on the bottom, in a little deeper water; he indicated that he was hooked up. Another Shark? Not this time! Although this fish produced some blazing runs, it surfaced in a shallow area and waved its large tail indicating that it was a sizeable redfish. Tyler deftly worked the red around sharp oysters which usually part light fishing line upon contact. Applying just the right amount of pressure and drag to wear the fish down, the big red surfaced boatside and I scooped it up in the landing net. It measured 36 inches, and was probably 15 to 18 pounds. This is a trophy catch on 12 lb. spinning tackle. We revived this beauty and she swam off to fight again another day.

Congrats to Tyler and crew for a memorable catch!

Now is the time to book a summer fishing trip as the action is red hot!

Call me at (904) 753-0882
Capt. Jim Wormhoudt
Cleansweep Charters

Offshore Amelia Island Offers Fishing Variety

Offshore Amelia Island Offers Fishing VarietyAmelia Island offers a variety of offshore fishing! Light and variable are two of my favorite weather terms in relation to wind conditions. As we rounded the South Jetty Can a small groundswell combined with east winds of the light and variable kind greeted us. We motored east toward the FC area to ply some of that area’s small ledges, live bottom and man made structures in hopes of catching newly legal gag grouper. In hindsight, I should have taken the time to catch live bait inshore as large pogy schools have been hanging near the Saint Mary’s inlet though they weren’t showing themselves early as the sun was not up high enough yet to make them easily visible. My idea that scaled sardines and cigar minnows would be plentiful as earlier in the week offshore didn’t pan out, so we utilized frozen pogies and fresh local squid. Always carry good fresh and or frozen bait offshore in case livies aren’t cooperative.

Amelia Island FishingOn our first drop over some submerged culvert pipes large triggerfish and numerous seabass of various sizes were the first to line the fishbox followed by a 15 pound snapper that tested the anglers mettle and was heartbreaking to release. Later, as we drifted over a small ledge, an 8 pound Grouper finally came over the gunnel followed by more seabass and a flounder. Another deeply bent rod and intense struggle produced another snapper of similar size and another one, slightly smaller. Will they ever open snapper season again? I’m convinced that had I taken the time to procure live bait that we would have attracted the attention of more grouper as the dead baits seem to become quickly devoured by the smaller seabass, sand perch, lizzardfish and the like while occasionally reaching a sizeable snapper or gag grouper. However, a tantalizing, swimming livebait will entice the larger and more aggressive fish like snapper and grouper, off the bottom quickly and also evade the smaller fish until larger ones can get to them.

Charter Fishing Amelia IslandAs we neared the south jetty entrance after an enjoyable ride home and enough fish for a good fish fry we noted acres of pogy pods just to the south of the channel with several slow trolling kingfish boats working the area. Kings should be showing up in the slough at the south end of Amelia Island, near pogy pods just off the beach and near the St. Mary’s shipping channel as water temperatures approach the low 80s. Spanish mackerel have been slow in showing up this year in their customary numbers; let’s hope their larger cousins the king mackerel will not follow suit.

Continued east winds should blow bait and striking fish closer to shore, so lets go fishing and take advantage of Amelia island’s greatest natural resource.

Call me at (904) 753-0882 for a charter booking or for the latest fishing information.

Capt. Jim Wormhoudt
Clean Sweep Fishing Charters

Nassau Sport Fishing Association Fishing Rodeo

Nassau Sport Fishing Association Fishing RodeoThere is an all new “Fernandina Beach Fishing Rodeo” presented by the Nassau Sport Fishing Association. What used to be known as the “Nassau Sport Fishing Association Tournament of Champions, is still an SKA sanctioned kingfish tournament that now targets a variety of deep sea and backwater game fish.

New dates bring this exciting, family oriented fishing event to Fernandina Beach August 5-7, 2011; with only one day of competition. The August dates were picked for this all new Fernandina Beach Fishing Rodeo when fishing for a variety of game fish is best!

Deep sea species for the rodeo portion of the event include amberjack, dolphin, grouper, wahoo and cobia. Backwater species include redfish, sea trout, flounder, sheepshead and the redfish with the most “Spots!”

The “Captain’s” meeting is scheduled for Friday evening at the Fernandina Harbor Marina where “Sounds on Centre” offers entertainment following the “Captain’s” meeting, with live music and dancing in the street from 6:00 to 8:00 PM.

For more information, visit www.fishnsfa.com, or call the tournament headquarters, “Amelia Angler Outfitters” at (904) 261-2870.

Fishing Closures Now Include Sea Bass

Sea Bass FishingIf you enjoy tasty sea bass as I do you’d better get out there and stock up, which is almost never a problem unless NOAA and the PEW people step in and declare that we no longer have the right to catch and eat them.

As of February 12, 2011, sea bass will join grouper, snapper and – for the month of February – speckled sea trout, in a closure that takes away the opportunity for many charter captains to earn a living and our right as recreational fishermen to harvest what is normally a wintertime staple for those who prefer to catch and eat fresh fish.

Amelia Island Fishing Charter

If you happen to be a sheephead, drum or redfish lookout, because the fishing pressure will certainly increase for such species!

Why aren’t the bag limits reduced instead of completely shutting down a fishery and putting more people out of work and forcing us to buy imported and farm raised fish?

Sounds “fishy” to me!

We have no idea under what conditions these imported products are raised, packed or shipped, but we do know that we are being steered away from harvesting and enjoying our own local seafood in favor of an inferior product. Most people don’t realize that we have some of the tastiest oysters and clams right here in our local waters, but for years they have been off limits for commercial and recreational harvest.

Sea Bass FishingEnough of my tirade against Big Brother, hopefully the weather will warm up soon and we can pursue whatever species are still available. Sunday looks like the best day to go offshore with two feet or less seas predicted. Sea bass and triggerfish are good bets at nearshore reefs. A downsized hook will work well, especially for the triggers as they have small mouths. The smaller hook is also likely to reduce your chances of bringing a restricted snapper or grouper to the boat. Sheephead will also be biting on these same reefs and wrecks on live fiddler crabs. Offshore flounder will also be showing up usually on a flat, sandy side of bottom structure and they will follow your bait almost to the boat. Sometimes they will rise up and hit a descending bait as you lower it to the bottom. They will eat cut bait, squid and jigs bounced up and down near the bottom. These flounder are usually in the 3 to 7 lb. range and travel in schools offshore before migrating inshore.

I hope that these closures will eventually be lifted and the fishing action will be even better than ever.

Bass fishing in Lofton Creek is heating up and will be great over the next few months as the bass are bedding this time of year and are hungry.

Call me or email for the latest fishing info or to book a fishing adventure aboard the CleanSweep charter boat.

Captain Jim Wormhoudt
CleanSweep Fishing Charters

Call me at (904) 753-0882 or drop me a line at: j_wormhoudt@yahoo.com

Amelia Island Sports Amazing Fishing

Amelia Island Fishing

Amelia Island Fishing

The wind is whipping and the thermometer barely registers 50 degrees. Outside of bagging a few Bass working a plastic worm at a snails pace off the dock in my backyard, only the crabbers and shrimpers are bold enough to be on the water today. With colder weather on the way it may be awhile before water temps and wind conditions allow me to get out.

Last week provided some exceptional offshore fishing for those lucky enough to be able to reach the Elton bottom and the gulfstream waters some 70 miles offshore of Amelia Island. Local seasoned veterans know that winter and springtime provide some of the best Wahoo, Dolphin, Tuna and even Sailfish action to be found anywhere. Due to the distance and weather conditions this time of year there is little pressure on this vast and truly world class fishery.

Speaking of Sailfish and warm weather, I recall a fishing trip several summers ago late in July involving myself and Lawrence Mackie plying the waters only some seven miles off Cumberland Island. We were slow trolling live Menhaden (pogies) in search of King Mackeral. This area known as “KBY” has manmade structure consisting of concrete rubble dumped there during the construction of the Kings Bay Naval Base as well as a sunken barge and tugboat spread out over a large area. We secured a live-well full of Menhaden along the Cumberland Island shore and shortly thereafter we were trolling live baits and chumming following a pattern that went from one pile of rubble to another as indicated on our fishfinder. Almost like clockwork as we passed over an area of stucture one of the trollong rods would go off ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ, screaming reels and bent rods provided solid action from Jack Crevalle, Barracuda, Sharks, Bonito and even our targeted species King Mackeral. We had two “smoker” size Kingfish gaffed and resting quietly in the fishbox. We were pulling in lines to try fishing another nearby rubble pile when we got lazy and decided to leave two lines out for our short run, allowing the baits to skip along on the surface. As the boat was just shy of coming up on plane one of the rods left trolling doubled over and I asked Lawrence if we were snagged on something when a sailfish began cartwheeling in our boat wake.

Sailfish

Sailfish

We yelled, “Sailfish!” at the same time and Lawrence grabbed the rod while I slowed the boat just slightly to keep pressure on the leaping fish. I reached for a camara and as I began snapping off pictures the film emerged from the camara and fell to the boat floor. Only one frame had advanced far enough to be salvaged showing the sailfish bill poking up out of the water.

We boated the Sail and released her unharmed high five-ing and celebrating our eventful day. As we trolled over the same area another larger Sailfish took our bait and performed spectacularly. To our amazement we had two Sails in one day.

Fortunately we had been corresponding with another fishing boat via the VHF radio regarding our sailfish encounter and being in the area they motored over and took some pictures of the second Sail after it had been boated. It too was revived and released unharmed. What a day!

Sailfish Caught off Amelia Island

Sailfish Caught off Amelia Island

Notably we had spotted numerous Flying fish in the area and they may have been the key to catching Sailfish so close to shore. Similarly I once caught Dolphin (Mahi Mahi, not Flipper) at the Nassau Live Bottom only four miles off the south end of the island and Flying fish were present that day as well.

We have an amazing fishery here in the waters of Northeast Florida. Lets enjoy it and be conservative with its bounty but also keep abreast of the many government regulations and restrictions aimed at severely restricting our right to catch and keep fish. Take the Kids fishing and they will encounter and embrace nature up close creating memories for a lifetime. Memories not formed by a cell phone or computer, but by being there and learning first hand about our natural world.

Call me for a truly memorable day on the water surrounding Amelia Island!

Captain Jim Wormhoudt
CleanSweep Charters
(904) 753-0882

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