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Carvalho’s Journey Presented at Fernandina Library

Carvalho’s Journey
The year was 1853 when famed explorer John Fremont organized his fifth, and final, expedition across the American West. Solomon Carvalho, a portrait painter who had never saddled his own horse, a Sephardic Jew and one of Americas first photographers, signed on for the gueling journey. He traveled with mountian men, pioneers, Native Americans, and Mormons, on this 2400 mile trip into the American West that would take more than a year to complete.

The entire crew faced many disasters, including waist high snow in mountains of Utah, sudden wild fires and starvation. Yet many of the beautiful vistas and images we know of the West are due to Carvalho’s photography.

Watch the film and be a part of the journey. The screening will be held August 25 at 6:00 p.m. at the Fernandina Beach Branch Library Community Room. An optional dinner will follow at 7:45 pm at Café Karibo.

Free tickets for the film, and dinner reservations, are now available at the Library. For further information please visit www.nassaureads.com or call (904) 277-7365.

This program is sponsored by Friends of the Fernandina Beach Library.

56 Patriots – A 4th of July History Lesson

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

-Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.
-Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
-Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
-Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists; Eleven were merchants; Nine were farmers and large plantation owners, men of means, well educated; But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed and Nelson died bankrupt.

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.

Some of us take these liberties so much for granted, but we should not. So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It’s not much to ask for the price they paid.

Remember: Freedom is never free!

Southern Blacks and the American Revolution

Southern Blacks and the American RevolutionThe Amelia Museum of History’s next 3rd on 3rd Presentation is Friday, November 20, at 6:00 PM, and is titled, “Hope of Freedom: Southern Blacks and the American Revolution”, with Dr. Roger Smith.

During the American Revolution the British military offered freedom to enslaved blacks who fled to British camps to fight against the rebellion. But there was often a catch. This offer wasn’t available to those whose owners were loyal to the Crown. For those taken-in, many were cast aside when disease swept through a camp, or abandoned to an oncoming American army during retreats; some were resold into slavery. For a great many people these promises of liberty were a complete façade, designed only to ruin the highly profitable southern plantation economies of the newly-founded United States. But many did indeed regain control of their own destinies against all odds.

The role of British East Florida in this tragic era of American history needs to be understood. The heroics and heartbreaks of southern blacks demands to be heard.

This program is made possible by the Florida Humanities Council’s Speakers Bureau program, and is free and open to the public. Seating is first-come, first-served.

For more information contact Gray at 261-7378 ext 102, or gray@ameliamuseum.org.

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Amelia Museum’s September 2015 3rd on 3rd

Amelia Museum's September 2015 3rd on 3rdThe Amelia Island Museum of History’s upcoming 3rd on 3rd lecture will be held September 18, at 6:00 PM in the Peck Auditorium (516 South Tenth Street, Fernandina).

Special guest Greg Parsons, Curator at the Camp Blanding Museum and Memorial Park, will discuss the fascinating history of Camp Blanding. During WWII, Camp Blanding was a major training facility for the United States Army, housing around 55,000 soldiers at a time. At one point during the war it was the fourth largest city in Florida by population.

For most of 1944 and 1945, a very large percentage of the individuals sent to replenish the ranks of America’s combat infantry formations trained at the Camp’s IRTC. In Addition, the Camp was the site of a 2800-bed hospital, a German Prisoner of War Compound and at the war’s end, a Separation Center.

This program is free for members with a suggested donation of $5.00 for nonmembers. Seating is first-come/first-served.

For more information contact Gray at 261-7378 ext 102, or gray@ameliamuseum.org.

Fernandina Death and Burial Records Presentation

Fernandina Death and Burial Records PresentationAmelia Island Museum of History’s 3rd on 3rd Presentation, Fernandina Death & Burial Records, with Joshua Goodman, will be held on August 21, 2015, at 6:00 PM in the Peck Auditorium.

Join the museum as special guest Joshua Goodman, an Archives Historian at the State Archives of Florida, will discuss the value of Fernandina’s Death and Burial Records for studying genealogy, and the history of public health in Florida at the turn of the 20th century.

This program is free and open to the public.

The Peck Center’s Willie Mae Ashley Auditorium is located at 516 S 10th Street.

Seating is first-come/first-served. For more information contact Gray at 261-7378 ext 102, or gray@ameliamuseum.org.

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Palace Saloon Makes the 16 Most Historic Southern Bars Worth Traveling For

Palace Saloon Makes the 16 Most Historic Southern Bars Worth Traveling ForOur own Palace Saloon in historic, downtown Fernandina Beach has make the list as seen on the site VacationsMadeEasy.com. Their writers searched the South virtually bellying up to significantly historic bars looking for the most unique and authentic experiences.

They searched Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisianna, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and of course Florida, where they stumbled into The Palace Saloon. While there was no mention of their popular specialty drink, The Pirates Punch, our fine local establishment is in the great company of other historic bars of the south.

Read the entire article by clicking HERE.

The Palace Saloon will be featuring a great performance on August 15th by the band, Blistur, a rockin’ trio from Jacksonville, Florida!

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Chevrolet Selects Florida House To Feature Its 2016 Model Equinox

Chevrolet Selects Florida House To Feature Its 2016 Model EquinoxFERNANDINA BEACH, FL – The landmark 158-year-old Florida House here was selected by the Chevrolet Division of General Motors to feature the 2016 Equinox, its compact sports utility vehicle, and will be highlighted in the company’s new magazine “New Roads.”

The new Equinox arrived Monday evening, August 3, while GM film crews, magazine writers and Chevrolet and hotel executives busied themselves preparing for the photo and filming sessions.

The first issue of “New Roads” magazine was published this past spring. It is distributed to more than six and one-half million people, particularly Chevrolet owners, and contains a variety of lifestyle stories ranging from the obvious automobile articles to recipes, movie and travel features.

The Florida House was selected by Chevrolet for its durability, authenticity and historic significance.

“From what we’ve been told the evaluation process was extensive and rigorous and we’re flattered and honored that Chevrolet selected the Florida House as one of the four U.S. sites to introduce its 2016 Equinox,” said Ernie Saltmarsh, the hotel owner. “I know that our location in the historic town of Fernandina Beach on Amelia Island was instrumental in the company’s decision and together we all benefit.”

Describing the hotel in the article writer Bob Butz says: “After the Civil War, the railroad was finally completed and the Florida House Inn, now on the National Register of Historic Places and the oldest hotel in the state, became a playground for the rich. Vanderbilt, DuPont, J.P. Morgan and the Carnegies (who owned a home on nearby Cumberland Island) all stayed and hosted countless dinner parties here.

“The reason to visit the Florida House Inn is simple,” he continues. “Unless you get an invite to overnight at the White House, it might be impossible to sleep in rooms and wander through more historically significant halls.”

“This building has survived hurricanes, terrible financial periods and the Civil War with the rooms and the architectural details of the interior amazingly intact,” says Florida House owner Saltmarsh.

The article describes downtown Fernandina Beach while plugging the new SUV saying, “Downtown Fernandina Beach is also one of Florida’s great antiquing destinations, and with the second row of seats folded, the Equinox has an impressive 63.7 cubic feet of cargo space for that Blackbeard the Pirate mannequin you must have for your man cave.”

The Florida House was built in 1857 by David Yulee to house employees working on the cross state railroad that he was constructing to connect the Fernandina port with the Gulf Coast in Cedar Key. It was renovated in 2001 and brought back with its original historic features and to its elegant state in 2011 by Saltmarsh.

For information about the Florida House go to www.floridahouseinn.com. To view an online version of the New Roads Magazine Click HERE.

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2015 Amelia Island Museum’s Community Appreciation Day

2015 Amelia Island Museum's Community Appreciation DayFernandina Beach, FL – The Amelia Island Museum of History is proud to celebrate the launch of AIMH Education Director Gray Edenfield’s first book, Amelia Island: Birthplace of the Modern Shrimping Industry (Fonthill Media), Saturday, August 8th from 10 am to 2 pm. Books will go on sale for the first time during the Museum’s annual Community Appreciation Day, and the author will be available to sign copies.

Amelia Island: Birthplace of the Modern Shrimping Industry is a well-researched and well-illustrated historical work, which tells the story of how a small barrier island community in Northeast Florida left its mark on a worldwide industry. At the beginning of the twentieth century, an assortment of upstart dreamers and pioneers living on Amelia Island made a series of innovations that would revolutionize commercial shrimping. Master fishermen, net makers, and boat builders from different parts of the world gravitated to the area, and this infusion of people from diverse backgrounds and cultures created a truly unique community. Shrimping and its symbiotic industries brought economic stability to an area in desperate need of direction, and the colorful characters that came along with the tide have become part of the island’s identity: past, present, and future. History is alive, and so are the people who make it.

Community Appreciation Day (August 8, 2015) is an annual event in which the Amelia Island Museum of History gives back to Nassau County by offering free admission, along with an awesome array of family friendly activities, including face painting, games, hands on learning activities, and even a bounce house! Not to mention live music, raffles, and giveaways generously donated by local businesses. The Amelia Island Museum of History is located at 233 S. 3rd Street, Fernandina Beach, Florida, and is open Monday through Saturday 10 am – 4 pm, and Sunday from 1-4 pm. Guided docent tours at 11 am and 2 pm daily.

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State Historical Market Application Submitted for Peck High

State Historical Market Application Submitted for Peck HighThe City is pleased to share that it has submitted an application for a Florida Historical Marker for Peck High School, now known as the Peck Center, in conjunction with the Peck Alumni Association. The Peck Center is located at 516 S. 10th Street. The application will be reviewed by the State Historical Marker Council at their September meeting.

The school was built in 1927 as Nassau Colored School Number 1 and known as Peck High School, which served grades one through twelve. The school was constructed as part of the Rosenwald Schools program, which began in 1912 and ended in 1932, and funded the construction of more than 5,300 African-American schools. Peck High School was named after William Henderson Peck, one of the early principals and champions of African-American education in Fernandina Beach. W.H. Peck is among the Great Floridians of the state.

The school was closed in 1969 after desegregation, and for many years was empty. Significant deterioration led community activists to champion preservation of the building beginning in the early 1980’s. The Nassau County School Board transferred ownership of the site to the City of Fernandina Beach in 1989. In the 1990’s, the Florida Division of Historical Resources awarded Special Category Grants to restore Peck High School and return the building to its original appearance.

Today the complex serves as an important community cornerstone and is home to City offices, non-profits, classes and activities, and recreation. In 2010, the Peck Center Complex was included in the City’s local historic district in order to protect the structure for future generations. The building serves as a significant component of the story of African-American heritage in Fernandina Beach.

If approved by the Division of Historical Resources, the Peck Alumni Association will sponsor the marker cost, and the City will install and maintain the marker. The marker is proposed to be placed near the front of the main Peck entrance. The City thanks Ruth Terrell, a Peck alumna, who worked with staff on the marker application.

Adrienne Burke, Community Development Director, attended the National Rosenwald Schools Conference in June 2015 to share the story of Peck High School. Plans are underway with the Amelia Island Museum of History to have a series of events celebrating Peck High next February during African-American History Month.

For more information on the Florida Historical Marker program and the State Historical Marker Council, visit http://dos.myflorida.com/historical/preservation/historical-markers. For information on the Rosenwald Schools program, visit the National Trust for Historic Preservation site at http://www.preservationnation.org/rosenwald.

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Mid-Century Beachfront Architectural Survey Taking Place

Mid-Century Beachfront Architectural Survey Taking PlaceIn an effort to document the city of Fernandina Beach’s architectural resources outside the Historic Districts, the City Planning Department will again be conducting a documentation survey this summer. In 2012, the Planning Department survey project evaluated beachfront development in the City. Beachfront development was identified in the City’s 2011 Reconnaissance-Level Architectural Survey conducted by Janus Research as a high-priority survey item. Until the survey was completed, little concentrated research had been done on the City’s beachfront development history and the structures along the beach. The project resulted in baseline structure documentation and a research report.

This year, the survey work will encompass mid-century architectural resources. No work has been done to date to recognize local mid-century architectural resources, which are buildings built during the 1940’s to 1960’s. The City is fortunate to be partnering with the Amelia Island Museum of History to conduct this survey. A Museum intern will be working on the project. The survey field work will consist of collecting historical information on neighborhood and building development in the City, and taking photographs of residential and commercial buildings in neighborhoods downtown and north and south of Atlantic Avenue. Photographs will be taken from the right-of-way only and will not encroach on private property.

This survey, along with the 2012 beachfront survey, is being done for informational purposes only, to document existing structures as of the survey date. The 2011 Janus Survey did not identify any potential new historic districts in the City.

For more information or to ask questions, please call the City of Fernandina Beach Community Development Department at 904-310-3135 or email Adrienne Burke at aburke@fbfl.org.

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3rd on 3rd St with Dr. Keith Ashley

 3rd on 3rd St with Dr. Keith AshleyFriday, May 15th, at 6:00 pm, the Amelia Island Museum of History invites you to its next 3rd on 3rd Street Presentation, with Dr. Keith Ashley. He will be discussing the Excavations of Santa Cruz de Guadalquini Spanish and Mocama Missions.

Dr. Ashley is Coordinator of Archaeological Research and an adjunct in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of North Florida.

A mixture of various Native American groups, including Mocama speaking people – Colones, Yguajas and Asajo (Yamassee) – established the mission on the southern end of Black Hammock Island in 1684. Sometime between 1695 and 1697 the population of Santa Cruz joined the mission people at San Juan del Puerto on Fort George Island, Duval County, Florida. The people of Santa Cruz were under threat of attack from nearby enemy groups and vulnerable due to their close proximity to the mainland. UNF has been excavating the site since 2001.

This program is free for members, with a suggested donation of $5.00 for non-members. Seating is first-come/first-served.

For more information contact Gray at gray@ameliamuseum.org, or (904) 261-7378 ext 102.

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Kings Ferry Historical Marker Dedication in West Nassau

Kings Ferry Historical Marker Dedication in West NassauNassau County, FL – The West Nassau Historical Society will dedicate the official state Kings Ferry historical marker on Saturday, March 14, at 10 AM at the Kings Ferry Boat Ramp in Nassau County, Florida. The brief ceremony will cap a nearly two-year long project by the all volunteer nonprofit to place a marker at the quiet, yet historic river hamlet.

The first draft of the marker text was written after holding meetings with area residents and researching the Revolutionary War-era river crossing of the British-built Kings Road at the St. Marys River. It was one of several gateway points into the British controlled East Florida territory during America’s War of Independence. The second phase included several text-editing and review meetings with the State of Florida and months of fundraising projects and events to pay for the state-sanctioned marker.

A wooden directional signpost pointing toward the various locales along the river and road will be erected beside the marker. Historical Society President Emily Baumgartner will preside over the 30-minute ceremony where guests will be welcomed, donors acknowledged, and the marker unveiled.

The Nassau Board of County Commissioners will also be thanked for approving the marker location at the county-maintained boat ramp located at the end of Bill Johnson Road. Other group members will serve light refreshments. The public is invited to attend but are encouraged to bring their lawn chair as seating and parking are limited. The boat ramp will be closed to boaters the morning of the ceremony. Kings Ferry is located at the north end of CR 115A about 13 miles northeast of the town of Hilliard.

The West Nassau Historical Society is a 501c3 nonprofit in its 40th year of highlighting and promoting the rich and diverse history that is western Nassau County, Florida. Anyone wishing to donate to this or future projects or help us in celebrating our county’s rich and diverse history please contact us at 904-879-3406 or visit our web site at www.wnhsfl.org. Our next general monthly meeting open to the public is Thursday, February 26, inside the annex of the historic Callahan Train Depot, 45383 Dixie Ave., starting with a pot luck dinner at 6:30 pm followed by the meeting at 7 pm.

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Black History Month at Fernandina Beach Library

Black History Month at Fernandina Beach LibraryThe Nassau County Library Fernandina Beach Branch announces two Black History Month events: the 26th Annual National African American Read-In on Feb. 2, and a program on the life of civil rights attorney and Fernandina Beach native, Raymond Brown, on February 26. Both programs will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Willie Mae Ashley Auditorium of the Peck Center, 516 South 10th Street, Fernandina Beach. Both events are free, open to the public and sponsored by the Friends of the Fernandina Beach Library and the Association for the Study and Preservation of African American History in Nassau County.

Read-In February 2 Dedicated to Memory of Willie Mae Ashley
This year’s Read-In in which residents read from works by African American authors, is dedicated to the memory of Willie Mae Ashley who passed away in 2014. Mrs. Ashley was a revered local educator, author, missionary, historian, Nassau County citizen and avid supporter of the library and Black History Month programs.

The Read-In is part of a national program now in its 26th year that was developed by the Black Caucus of the National Teachers of English and the National Council of the Teachers of English to promote literacy and the contributions of African American authors. Everyone is invited. If you would like to participate, select a short passage to read from your favorite African American author. For more information or to sign up to read, contact the Fernandina Beach Branch Library at 904-277-7365. All programs are free and open to the public.

Atty. Raymond A. Brown Focus of February 26 Program
Professor Will Guzmán will discuss the life of Raymond A. Brown (1915-2009), noted civil rights attorney and Fernandina Beach native, who has been described as the “best defense attorney in America… Darrow-esque.” Brown was born into a working class family in 1915, joined the Civilian Conservation Corps, graduated from Florida A&M College, served in the U.S. Army and graduated from Fordham Law School. After admittance to the New Jersey Bar in 1949, he practiced law for nearly 60-years representing national figures such as poet Amiri Baraka, activists Assata Shakur and H. Rap Brown, and professional boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter. He also represented working-class and indigent defendants when no one else would offer legal aid due to lack of funds, political beliefs, or social status.

Guzmán is an Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies at Florida A&M University and Director of Community and Donor Engagement at the Carrie P. Meek—James N. Eaton Southeastern Regional Black Archives, Research Center and Museum. His book, Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands: Dr. Lawrence A. Nixon and Black Activism is scheduled for release by the University of Illinois Press in June 2015. This program will also take place in the Willie Mae Ashley Auditorium at the Peck Center.

Both events are free, open to the public and sponsored by the Friends of the Fernandina Beach Library and the Association for the Study and Preservation of African American History in Nassau County. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations to participate in these programs should contact the Library at 904-277-7365, or the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 at least five days in advance to request accommodations.

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Diary of Molly Crichton at Amelia Island Museum

Diary of Molly Crichton at Amelia Island MuseumMonday, January 12, at 7:30 PM, the Amelia Island Museum of History will feature Larry Skinner as he tells you about The Diary of Molly Crichton at the Meeting of the General Lamont Duncan Clinch Historical Society.

In 1864 a sixteen year old girl, named Mary Louisa Crichton, also known as “Molly,” began a diary. It was the last year of the War Between the States. Molly was the daughter of Alexander Crichton, one of the original signers of the State of Florida’s founding Constitution. In her young life she had experienced her father’s death, a move to Fernandina Beach with her mother to live with her grandfather, who was postmaster before the War, and she escaped Fernandina just before Union troops arrived. Now, at 16, she was living in Waldo, as a refugee from the war.

Skinner will relate his research from Molly Crichton’s diary during the last year of the war. During this year she was to meet her future husband, and lay the foundation for a family who would settle in Nassau County and become one of the leaders of the community in western Nassau County, and whose descendents still live here today.

We hope you will come to the next meeting of the General Duncan Lamont Clinch Historical Society. The meeting will be held at the Amelia Island Museum of History on Monday, January 12th at 7:30 PM.

Refreshments will be served.

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Barbary Pirates and Thomas Jefferson’s War Against Ransom

Barbary Pirates and Thomas Jefferson's War Against RansomHere is a viral email I received from my cousin, Mary Ell. While looking on the World Wide Web to see if there was any truth to the statement that Thomas Jefferson led America to war against Muslim pirates from North Africa’s Babary Coast, I found some interesting history that I must have forgotten since high school. Either way, it is an interesting read, and an interesting read on a rainy Sunday is not a bad way to spend a few short minutes.

This is the email:

“Here is a little history. Including how the Marine Corps term ‘Leatherneck’ came to be.

Most Americans are unaware of the fact that over two hundred years ago, the United States had declared war on Islam, and Thomas Jefferson led the charge!

At the height of the eighteenth century, Muslim pirates were the terror of the Mediterranean and a large area of the North Atlantic. They attacked every ship in sight, and held the crews for exorbitant ransoms. Those taken hostage were subjected to barbaric treatment and wrote heart breaking letters home, begging their government and family members to pay whatever their Mohammedan captors demanded.

These extortionists of the high seas represented the Islamic nations of Tripoli, Tunis, Morocco, and Algiers – collectively referred to as the Barbary Coast – and presented a dangerous and unprovoked threat to the new American Republic.

Before the Revolutionary War, U.S. merchant ships had been under the protection of Great Britain. When the U.S. declared its independence and entered into war, the ships of the United States were protected by France. However, once the war was won, America had to protect its own fleets. Thus, the birth of the U.S. Navy.

Beginning in 1784, seventeen years before he would become president, Thomas Jefferson became America’s Minister to France. That same year, the U.S. Congress sought to appease its Muslim adversaries by following in the footsteps of European nations who paid bribes to the Barbary States, rather than engaging them in war.

In July of 1785, Algerian pirates captured American ships, and the Dey of Algiers demanded an unheard-of ransom of $60,000. It was a plain and simple case of extortion, and Thomas Jefferson was vehemently opposed to any further payments. Instead, he proposed to Congress the formation of a coalition of allied nations who together could force the Islamic states into peace. A disinterested Congress decided to pay the ransom.

In 1786, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams met with Tripoli’s ambassador to Great Britain to ask by what right his nation attacked American ships and enslaved American citizens, and why Muslims held so much hostility towards America, a nation with which they had no previous contacts.

The two future presidents reported that Ambassador Sidi Haji Abdul Rahman Adja had answered that Islam “was founded on the Laws of their Prophet, that it was written in their Quran, that all nations who should not have acknowledged their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as Prisoners, and that every Musselman (Muslim) who should be slain in Battle was sure to go to Paradise.

Despite this stunning admission of premeditated violence on non-Muslim nations, as well as the objections of many notable American leaders, including George Washington, who warned that caving in was both wrong and would only further embolden the enemy, for the following fifteen years, the American government paid the Muslims millions of dollars for the safe passage of American ships or the return of American hostages. The payments in ransom and tribute amounted to over twenty percent of the United States government annual revenues in 1800.

Jefferson was disgusted. Shortly after his being sworn in as the third President of the United States in 1801, the Pasha of Tripoli sent him a note demanding the immediate payment of $225,000 plus $25,000 a year for every year forthcoming. That changed everything.

Jefferson let the Pasha know, in no uncertain terms, what he could do with his demand. The Pasha responded by cutting down the flagpole at the American consulate and declared war on the United States.

Tunis, Morocco, and Algiers immediately followed suit.

Jefferson, until now, had been against America raising a naval force for anything beyond coastal defense, but having watched his nation be cowed by Islamic thuggery for long enough, decided that it was finally time to meet force with force.

He dispatched a squadron of frigates to the Mediterranean and taught the Muslim nations of the Barbary Coast a lesson he hoped they would never forget. Congress authorized Jefferson to empower U.S. ships to seize all vessels and goods of the Pasha of Tripoli and to “cause to be done all other acts of precaution or hostility as the state of war would justify”.

When Algiers and Tunis, who were both accustomed to American cowardice and acquiescence, saw the newly independent United States had both the will and the might to strike back, they quickly abandoned their allegiance to Tripoli.

The war with Tripoli lasted for four more years, and raged up again in 1815. The bravery of the U.S. Marine Corps in these wars led to the line “to the shores of Tripoli” in the Marine Hymn, They would forever be known as “leathernecks” for the leather collars of their uniforms.

Islam, and what its Barbary followers justified doing in the name of their prophet and their god, disturbed Jefferson quite deeply. America had a tradition of religious tolerance, the fact that Jefferson, himself, had co-authored the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, but fundamentalist Islam was like no other religion the world had ever seen. A religion based on supremacism, whose holy book not only condoned but mandated violence against unbelievers was unacceptable to him. His greatest fear was that someday this brand of Islam would return and pose an even greater threat to the United States.

This should bother every American. That the Islams have brought about women-only classes and swimming times at taxpayer-funded universities (Washington State University has a “Women’s Only Swim” on their website.) and public pools; that Christians, Jews, and Hindus have been banned from serving on juries where Muslim defendants are being judged, Piggy banks and Porky Pig tissue dispensers have been banned from workplaces because they offend Islamist sensibilities. Ice cream has been discontinued at certain Burger King locations because the picture on the wrapper looks similar to the Arabic script for Allah, public schools are pulling pork from their menus, on and on in the news papers.

It’s death by a thousand cuts, or inch-by-inch as some refer to it, and most Americans have no idea that this battle is being waged every day across America. By not fighting back, by allowing groups to obfuscate what is really happening, and not insisting that the Islamists adapt to our own culture, the United States is cutting its own throat with a politically correct knife, and helping to further the Islamists agenda.

Sadly, it appears that today’s America would rather be politically correct than victorious.

Any doubts, just Google Thomas Jefferson vs the Muslim World.”

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