Local Shrimping and Net Making History with Burbank Brothers

ShrimpNetsFriends of the Library is proud to present an informative evening with Mr. Billy Burbank III and his brother Frank Burbank who are part of Fernandina Beach’s renowned shrimping and net making family. Folklorist Dr. Peggy Bulger will interview the brothers in an informal and audience-participation evening that will explore Fernandina Beach’s history and heritage grounded in the shrimping industry.

Join Dr. Bulger and the Burbank Brothers on Monday evening October 16th from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. in the Fernandina Beach Library Community Room, 25 N. 4th Street. A slide show and video clips, as well as recorded interview clips with Dorothy Burbank Jones (age 94) will be part of the evening’s program.
Participation is limited, so register in advance by calling the library at 904-530-6500, Ext. 1. If you are not able to attend, please call the library to cancel so someone on the waiting list may participate.

For further information regarding this event, on joining Friends of the Library, or to donate, please visit the Friends of the Library website at www.fernandinaFOL.org.

Positive Parenting

Parents have an important job. Raising kids is both rewarding and challenging. You’re likely to get a lot of advice along the way, from doctors, family, friends, and even strangers. But every parent and child is unique. Being sensitive and responsive to your kids can help you build positive, healthy relationships together.

“Being a sensitive parent and responding to your kids cuts across all areas of parenting,” says Arizona State University’s Dr. Keith Crnic, a parent-child relationship expert. “What it means is recognizing what your child needs in the moment and providing that in an effective way.” This can be especially critical for infants and toddlers, he adds. Strong emotional bonds often develop through sensitive, responsive, and consistent parenting in the first years of life. For instance, holding your baby lovingly and responding to their cries helps build strong bonds.

Building Bonds
Strong emotional bonds help children learn how to manage their own feelings and behaviors and develop self-confidence. They help create a safe base from which they can explore, learn, and relate to others.
Experts call this type of strong connection between children and their caregivers “secure attachment.” Securely attached children are more likely to be able to cope with challenges like poverty, family instability, parental stress, and depression.

A recent analysis shows that about 6 out of 10 children in the U.S. develop secure attachments to their parents. The 4 out of 10 kids who lack such bonds may avoid their parents when they are upset or resist their parents if they cause them more distress. Studies suggest that this can make kids more prone to serious behavior problems. Researchers have been testing programs to help parents develop behaviors that encourage secure attachment.

Being Available
Modern life is full of things that can influence your ability to be sensitive and responsive to your child. These include competing priorities, extra work, lack of sleep, and things like mobile devices. Some experts are concerned about the effects that distracted parenting may have on emotional bonding and children’s language development, social interaction, and safety.

If parents are inconsistently available, kids can get distressed and feel hurt, rejected, or ignored. They may have more emotional outbursts and feel alone. They may even stop trying to compete for their parent’s attention and start to lose emotional connections to their parents.

“There are times when kids really do need your attention and want your recognition,” Crnic explains. Parents need to communicate that their kids are valuable and important, and children need to know that parents care what they’re doing, he says.

It can be tough to respond with sensitivity during tantrums, arguments, or other challenging times with your kids. “If parents respond by being irritable or aggressive themselves, children can mimic that behavior, and a negative cycle then continues to escalate,” explains Dr. Carol Metzler, who studies parenting at the Oregon Research Institute.

According to Crnic, kids start to regulate their own emotions and behavior around age three. Up until then, they depend more on you to help them regulate their emotions, whether to calm them or help get them excited. “They’re watching you to see how you do it and listening to how you talk to them about it,” he explains. “Parents need to be good self-regulators. You’re not only trying to regulate your own emotions in the moment, but helping your child learn to manage their emotions and behavior.”

As kids become better at managing their feelings and behavior, it’s important to help them develop coping skills, like active problem solving. Such skills can help them feel confident in handling what comes their way.
“When parents engage positively with their children, teaching them the behaviors and skills that they need to cope with the world, children learn to follow rules and regulate their own feelings,” Metzler says.

“As parents, we try really hard to protect our kids from the experience of bad things,” Crnic explains. “But if you protect them all the time and they are not in situations where they deal with difficult or adverse circumstances, they aren’t able to develop healthy coping skills.”

He encourages you to allow your kids to have more of those experiences and then help them learn how to solve the problems that emerge. Talk through the situation and their feelings. Then work with them to find solutions to put into practice. 
Meeting Needs
As children grow up, it’s important to remember that giving them what they need doesn’t mean giving them everything they want. “These two things are very different,” Crnic explains. “Really hone in on exactly what’s going on with your kid in the moment. This is an incredibly important parenting skill and it’s linked to so many great outcomes for kids.”

Think about where a child is in life and what skills they need to learn at that time. Perhaps they need help managing emotions, learning how to behave in a certain situation, thinking through a new task, or relating to friends.

“You want to help kids become confident,” Crnic says. “You don’t want to aim too high where they can’t get there or too low where they have already mastered the skill.” Another way to boost confidence while strengthening your relationship is to let your kid take the lead.

“Make some time to spend with your child that isn’t highly directive, where your child leads the play,” advises Dr. John Bates, who studies children’s behavior problems at Indiana University Bloomington. “Kids come to expect it and they love it, and it really improves the relationship.”

Bates also encourages parents to focus on their child’s actual needs instead of sticking to any specific parenting principles.

It’s never too late to start building a healthier, more positive relationship with your child, even if things have gotten strained and stressful. “Most importantly, make sure that your child knows that you love them and are on their side,” Metzler says. “For older children, let them know that you are genuinely committed to building a stronger relationship with them and helping them be successful.”

By being a sensitive and responsive parent, you can help set your kids on a positive path, teach them self-control, reduce the likelihood of troublesome behaviors, and build a warm, caring parent-child relationship.

Tips for Connecting with Your Kids
-Catch kids showing good behavior and offer specific praise.
-Give children meaningful jobs at home and positive recognition afterward. Don’t be overly critical; instead, help them improve their skills one step at a time.
-Use kind words, tones, and gestures when giving instructions or making requests. 
-Spend some time every day in warm, positive, loving interaction with your kids. Look for opportunities to spend time as a family, like taking after-dinner walks or reading books together.
-Brainstorm solutions to problems at home or school together.
-Set rules for yourself for mobile device use and other distractions. For instance, check your phone after your child goes to bed.
-Ask about your child’s concerns, worries, goals, and ideas.
-Participate in activities that your child enjoys. Help out with and attend their events, games, activities, and performances.

Written by NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

Coping With Grief – Life After Loss

Losing someone you love can change your world. You miss the person who has died and want them back. You may feel sad, alone, or even angry. You might have trouble concentrating or sleeping. If you were a busy caregiver, you might feel lost when you’re suddenly faced with lots of unscheduled time. These feelings are normal. There’s no right or wrong way to mourn. Scientists have been studying how we process grief and are learning more about healthy ways to cope with loss.

The death of a loved one can affect how you feel, how you act, and what you think. Together, these reactions are called grief. It’s a natural response to loss. Grieving doesn’t mean that you have to feel certain emotions. People can grieve in very different ways.

Cultural beliefs and traditions can influence how someone expresses grief and mourns. For example, in some cultures, grief is expressed quietly and privately. In others, it can be loud and out in the open. Culture also shapes how long family members are expected to grieve.

“People often believe they should feel a certain way,” says Dr. Wendy Lichtenthal, a psychologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. “But such ‘shoulds’ can lead to feeling badly about feeling badly. It’s hugely important to give yourself permission to grieve and allow yourself to feel whatever you are feeling. People can be quite hard on themselves and critical of what they are feeling. Be compassionate and kind to yourself.”

Adapting to Loss 
Experts say you should let yourself grieve in your own way and time. People have unique ways of expressing emotions. For example, some might express their feelings by doing things rather than talking about them. They may feel better going on a walk or swimming, or by doing something creative like writing or painting. For others, it may be more helpful to talk with family and friends about the person who’s gone, or with a counselor.

“Though people don’t often associate them with grief, laughing and smiling are also healthy responses to loss and can be protective,” explains Dr. George Bonanno, who studies how people cope with loss and trauma at Columbia University. He has found that people who express flexibility in their emotions often cope well with loss and are healthier over time.

“It’s not about whether you should express or suppress emotion, but that you can do this when the situation calls for it,” he says. For instance, a person with emotional flexibility can show positive feelings, like joy, when sharing a happy memory of the person they lost and then switch to expressing sadness or anger when recalling more negative memories, like an argument with that person.

Grief is a process of letting go and learning to accept and live with loss. The amount of time it takes to do this varies with each person. “Usually people experience a strong acute grief reaction when someone dies and at the same time they begin the gradual process of adapting to the loss,” explains psychiatrist Dr. M. Katherine Shear at Columbia University. “To adapt to a loss, a person needs to accept its finality and understand what it means to them. They also have to find a way to re-envision their life with possibilities for happiness and for honoring their enduring connection to the person who died.”

Researchers like Lichtenthal have found that finding meaning in life after loss can help you adapt. Connecting to those things that are most important, including the relationship with the person who died, can help you co-exist with the pain of grief.

Types of Grief 
About 10% of bereaved people experience complicated grief, a condition that makes it harder for some people to adapt to the loss of a loved one. People with this prolonged, intense grief tend to get caught up in certain kinds of thinking, says Shear, who studies complicated grief. They may think the death did not have to happen or happen in the way that it did. They also might judge their grief—questioning if it’s too little or too much—and focus on avoiding reminders of the loss.

“It can be very discouraging to experience complicated grief, but it’s important not to be judgmental about your grief and not to let other people judge you,” Shear explains.

Shear and her research team created and tested a specialized therapy for complicated grief in three NIH-funded studies. The therapy aimed to help people identify the thoughts, feelings, and actions that can get in the way of adapting to loss. They also focused on strengthening one’s natural process of adapting to loss. The studies showed that 70% of people taking part in the therapy reported improved symptoms. In comparison, only 30% of people who received the standard treatment for depression had improved symptoms.

You may begin to feel the loss of your loved one even before their death. This is called anticipatory grief. It’s common among people who are long-term caregivers. You might feel sad about the changes you are going through and the losses you are going to have. Some studies have found that when patients, doctors, and family members directly address the prospect of death before the loss happens, it helps survivors cope after the death.

Life Beyond Loss 
NIH-funded scientists continue to study different aspects of the grieving process. They hope their findings will suggest new ways to help people cope with the loss of a loved one. Although the death of a loved one can feel overwhelming, many people make it through the grieving process with the support of family and friends. Take care of yourself, accept offers of help from those around you, and be sure to get counseling if you need it.

“We believe grief is a form of love and it needs to find a place in your life after you lose someone close,” Shear says. “If you are having trouble moving forward in your own life, you may need professional help. Please don’t lose hope. We have some good ways to help you.”

Wise Choices – Coping With Loss
-Take care of yourself. Try to exercise regularly, eat healthy food, and get enough sleep. Avoid habits that can put your health at risk, like drinking too much alcohol or smoking.
-Talk with caring friends. Let others know if you need to talk.
-Try not to make any major changes right away. It’s a good idea to wait for a while before making big decisions, like moving or changing jobs.
-Join a grief support group in person or online. It might help to talk with others who are also grieving. Check with your local hospice, hospitals, religious communities, and government agencies to find a group in your area.
-Consider professional support. Sometimes talking to a counselor about your grief can help.
-Talk to your doctor. Be sure to let your healthcare provider know if you’re having trouble with everyday activities, like getting dressed, sleeping, or fixing meals.
-Be patient with yourself. Mourning takes time. It’s common to feel a mix of emotions for a while.

Written by NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

FSCJ to Host Event in Observance of Constitution Day 2017

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) has rescheduled its observance of Constitution Day 2017 for October 18 after the original event, set for September was canceled due to Hurricane Irma.

FSCJ’s Public Safety and Paralegal programs welcome the community, students, College faculty and staff for “Hamilton Was Not the Only Hip Founding Father: Meet James Madison.” The Honorable Timothy J. Corrigan, United States District Court Judge, will serve as the keynote speaker and will lead the discussion.

This event is co-hosted by the FSCJ Theta Sigma Chi Chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association. To register, email frando@fscj.edu.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017, at 6 p.m.
FSCJ Kent Campus Auditorium
3939 Roosevelt Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32205

2017 Jacksonville National College Fair

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) invites high school students and their parents/guardians to attend the Jacksonville National College Fair to learn more about FSCJ programs, free college opportunities through FSCJ Promise and transfer options through UNF Connect. Attendees will also have a chance to meet more than 100 college and university representatives from across the nation and attend workshops to help in preparing for college.

FSCJ will be at booth 519 and FSCJ’s recruitment team will host three break-out sessions:

Oh the Places You’ll Go: Selecting the Right College
Presented by Terry Hollingshead, FSCJ Senior Associate Director of Student Recruitment
9 a.m., Room 106

Hot Jobs in the 21st Century
Presented by Terry Hollingshead, FSCJ Senior Associate Director of Student Recruitment
Noon, Room 103

FAFSA Completion Lab
Hosted by FSCJ
9 a.m. – 1 p.m., North Ballroom

To learn about the other workshops that will be available and to register for the
fair, visit nacacfairs.org.

FSCJ representatives will also be onsite to answer questions on program of study options, admissions, enrollment, tuition, student life and more.

Students can register in advance online which makes navigating the fair and collecting information from multiple colleges and universities much easier for students. By pre-registering students can print a bar coded confirmation to be used on-site at the fair as an electronic ID. Pre-registration is not required to attend the fair.

For more information or to register, students and parents/guardians may visit fscj.edu/nacac.

Saturday, October 14, 2017, from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Free admission and parking
Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center
1000 Water St., Jacksonville, FL 32204

Man Drowns in Rough Surf

PRESS RELEASE: On September 24, 2017 at 3:18 PM Fernandina Beach Police Officers, Fernandina Beach Fire/Rescue and the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of two swimmers in distress during “Red Flag” conditions at Beach Access #6, which is in the 600 block of South Fletcher Avenue.

Upon arrival first responders found a 20 year old man safely out of the water, but in need of medical attention. He reported that his father was still in the water and needed to be rescued.

Rescue swimmers from Fernandina Beach Fire-Rescue, the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office, and an off-duty Fernandina Beach Lifeguard responded and began searching the rough waters. A local pilot responded to the call for assistance by circling the area looking for anyone in distress.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office Air Unit and the United States Coast Guard also arrived in the area in support of the search for the missing swimmer.

At 4:50 PM, an hour and a half after the first report, the drowning victim was located in the surf about 75’ south of where he had last been seen. Christopher Brian Murray, 49 years of age of Fernandina Beach, was pulled from the surf and pronounced deceased at the scene. The victim’s son, Cale Murray, was medically cleared by Fire/Rescue at the scene.

Baptist Nassau Presents the Shrimp Festival

The Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival Committee is pleased to announce that Baptist Medical Center-Nassau is the “Presenting Sponsor” of the 54th annual festival being held May 5 -7, 2017, in historic, downtown Fernandina Beach. “This opportunity is a natural partnership between the area’s only community hospital and the largest, longest running special event in our area”, said Baptist-Nassau’s President Ed Hubel, “sponsoring the festival is a natural extension of our commitment to our local communities.”

Baptist Medical Center Nassau is a highly advanced, extremely well-equipped community hospital on Amelia Island that provides a full spectrum of inpatient and outpatient services and 24-hour emergency care to coastal communities in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. The medical staff includes highly trained physicians in 24 different specialties who practice locally, and as part of the Baptist Health System. Baptist Nassau has access to many additional specialized physicians, services, and resources when needed.

The Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival kicks-off Thursday, May 4th, with a 6:00 p.m. Pirate Parade in downtown Fernandina. The festival officially opens Friday afternoon with a dedicated Kids’ Fun Zone at Central Park, and plenty of riverfront activities. The festival continues Saturday and Sunday with nearly 400 vendors displaying fine arts and crafts, antiques, and of course there will be lots of shrimp! You can expect contests, pageants, Pirates, and an incredible line-up of entertainment including an emotional Wreath Ceremony.

Located in the heart of the waterfront during the Shrimp Festival, Baptist-Nassau will be in attendance to showcase their services and staff. You are encouraged to stop by their booth where they will be sharing information and answering questions about quality health care available in our communities.

Consistently rated by “Sunshine Artist Magazine” in the top 100 North America best events, visit ShrimpFestival.com for more information.

Challenge Butter Demos and Giveaways at Shrimp Fest

(Press release) – Award-winning Challenge Butter is buttering up Floridians by donating more than 100 pounds of its fresh sweet cream butter to all of the food vendors cooking up local shrimp for the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival attendees. It’s also providing free samples from Chef Ryan Robinson of Brett’s Waterway Cafe, and free coupons.

Festivalgoers can enjoy watching Chef Ryan Robinson prepare and sample dishes made with Challenge Butter and Challenge Cream Cheese on-site at the Challenge Butter Kitchen, located on the lawn at the foot of Centre Street. Demos will be taking place on the hour beginning at 11 a.m. and ending at 3 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday.

The Challenge Butter booth is also fun place to stop for a chance to spin and win coupons, squishy cows and more.
New to Florida, Challenge is the leading butter brand in the West and has won accolades from the World Dairy Awards, Saveur Magazine and San Francisco Chronicle. Its butter and cream cheese are made from 100% real cream from its 450 family owned dairies.

A stickler for quality, Challenge products are free of growth hormones, artificial preservatives, dyes and fillers. And, its products are so fresh, they are ready for the grocer within 48 hours of the cows being milked. Look for them in the dairy case at Winn-Dixie and Wal-Mart. It’s the butter with the elk on the package.

The Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival is May 5 – 7, with a Pirate Parade kick-off on May 4th at 6:00 p.m. in historic, downtown Fernandina Beach. Enjoy a Kids Fun Zone, live musical entertainment, contests, food booths and more. On Saturday and Sunday there will be over 450 arts, crafts, antiques, and collectible booths. For more information, please visit www.ShrimpFestival.com.

ABOUT CHALLENGE BUTTER
Award-winning Challenge Butter began more than one hundred years ago. Today, it is the largest butter brand in the West and is available nationwide. Its portfolio of products includes Salted and Unsalted Challenge Butter, Whipped Challenge Butter and Salted and Unsalted European Style Butter. Its line of spreadable butters includes Italian Herb & Garlic, Cracked Pepper & Sea Salt, Challenge Lite Spreadable Butter with Olive Oil, a Challenge Spreadable Butter Flavored with Olive Oil, Challenge Spreadable Butter with Canola Oil and Challenge Lactose-Free Spreadable Butter. It recently introduced six cream cheese products including regular Challenge Cream Cheese, Challenge Spreadable Cream Cheese, Challenge Whipped Cream Cheese, Challenge Neufchatel Cheese, Challenge Salsa Flavored Cream Cheese and Challenge Strawberry Flavored Cream Cheese. Challenge has not only been a pioneer in the quality in butter products, but is also responsible for many industry firsts including invention of the first aluminum butter churn, lab sampling of butter and shipping butter in paper rather than wooden crates. Visit Challenge on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/ChallengeButter or at www.ChallengeDairy.com.

2017 Shrimp Festival Lot and Street Closures

Wondering how to get around downtown Fernandina Beach during the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival? Well, in certain areas you just can’t! Here are the scheduled street and parking lot closures for the 2017 Festival:

It takes a lot of time to set up a festival with nearly 400 arts, crafts, and antiques booths, food booths, sponsor tents, and other special exhibits so Lots A and B, at the waterfront, will be closed at 12:01 a.m. Thursday morning, May 4th, until noon, Monday, May 8, 2017.

The Festival kicks-off officially Thursday afternoon, on May 4th with a Pirate Parade that starts promptly at 6:00 p.m. so expect road closures on Ash and Centre Streets, from 11th to Second Streets, during the parade.

Immediately following the parade there will be a special Sounds on Centre street dance and live, free concert featuring Skip Towne and the Bounty Hunters. Centre Street, from Front to Second Streets will be closed until Sounds on Centre ends at approximately 9:30 p.m.

Lots C and D, along the river front, will be closed from 12:01 a.m on Friday, until Sunday, May 7th at 6:00 p.m.; some spaces in these lots will be available for parking by permit or payment only.

Noon Friday will see the closing of Centre Street at Second Street, to the waterfront, except for local traffic. At 4:00 p.m. Centre Street will close at Eighth Street, except for local traffic, and at 5:00 p.m. Centre Street and all streets one block north and one block south of Centre Street, from Seventh Street to the waterfront, will be closed to all traffic.

Roads and parking lots will remain closed until 6:00 p.m. on Sunday, May 7, 2017.

For more information, please visit ShrimpFestival.com.

2017 Shrimp Festival Pirate Parade is May 4th

Historic Fernandina Beach is home to one of the region’s largest hometown parades. This year’s theme is the Ultimate Shrimp Experience. The parade will begin promptly at 6 :00 p.m., Thursday, May 4, 2017, and with spectators lined up three and four people deep for over 16 blocks, there is no better way – for the money – to get in front of a crowd this large and local businesses have signed up! There are almost 100 entries in this parade!!!

There will be decorative floats, walking groups, marching bands, exotic and antique vehicles, and much more. This year’s grand marshal is Jeff “Trapper” Parish.

Parade categories include Non-profit, Commercial, Walking Unit, Band or Performing  Unit, Civic Group, Judges Choice, and Special Effects. Awards will be presented on the River Front Stage on Friday, May 5ht. All entries are required to commemorate the shrimping industry  by adhering to the Pirate Parade Theme and the parade may not be used as a public forum to air personal opinions, grievances, or to protest any issue. 

The Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival is a delicious Northeast Florida tradition being held May 5 – 7, 2017, and is presented by Baptist Medical Center-Nassau. The event kicks-off Thursday, May 4th, with a 6:00 p.m. Pirate Parade in downtown Fernandina Beach. The festival officially opens Friday afternoon with the Geico Kids’ Fun Zone, food booths, a pageant, live music, fireworks, a pirate invasion, river front entertainment, and more. The festival continues Saturday and Sunday with two stages, nearly 400 vendors displaying fine arts, crafts, and antiques. There will be contests, children’s activities, and food booths with lots of shrimp!

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