Preventing and Treating Drug Abuse

Drug abuse can be a painful experience—for the person who has the problem, and for family and friends who may feel helpless in the face of the disease. But there are things you can do if you know or suspect that someone close to you has a drug problem.

Certain drugs can change the structure and inner workings of the brain. With repeated use, they affect a person’s self-control and interfere with the ability to resist the urge to take the drug. Not being able to stop taking a drug even though you know it’s harmful is the hallmark of addiction.

A drug doesn’t have to be illegal to cause this effect. People can become addicted to alcohol, nicotine, or even prescription drugs when they use them in ways other than prescribed or use someone else’s prescription.
People are particularly vulnerable to using drugs when going through major life transitions. For adults, this might mean during a divorce or after losing a job. For children and teens, this can mean changing schools or other major upheavals in their lives.

But kids may experiment with drug use for many different reasons. “It could be a greater availability of drugs in a school with older students, or it could be that social activities are changing, or that they are trying to deal with stress,” says Dr. Bethany Deeds, an NIH expert on drug abuse prevention. Parents may need to pay more attention to their children during these periods.

The teenage years are a critical time to prevent drug use. Trying drugs as a teenager increases your chance of developing substance use disorders. The earlier the age of first use, the higher the risk of later addiction. But addiction also happens to adults. Adults are at increased risk of addiction when they encounter prescription pain-relieving drugs after a surgery or because of a chronic pain problem. People with a history of addiction should be particularly careful with opioid pain relievers and make sure to tell their doctors about past drug use.

There are many signs that may indicate a loved one is having a problem with drugs. They might lose interest in things that they used to enjoy or start to isolate themselves. Teens’ grades may drop. They may start skipping classes.

“They may violate curfew or appear irritable, sedated, or disheveled,” says child psychiatrist Dr. Geetha Subramaniam, an NIH expert on substance use. Parents may also come across drug paraphernalia, such as water pipes or needles, or notice a strange smell.

“Once drug use progresses, it becomes less of a social thing and more of a compulsive thing—which means the person spends a lot of time using drugs,” Subramaniam says.

If a loved one is using drugs, encourage them to talk to their primary care doctor. It can be easier to have this conversation with a doctor than a family member. Not all drug treatment requires long stays in residential treatment centers. For someone in the early stages of a substance use problem, a conversation with a doctor or another professional may be enough to get them the help they need. Doctors can help the person think about their drug use, understand the risk for addiction, and come up with a plan for change.

Substance use disorder can often be treated on an outpatient basis. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy to treat. Substance use disorder is a complicated disease. Drugs can cause changes in the brain that make it extremely difficult to quit without medical help.

For certain substances, it can be dangerous to stop the drug without medical intervention. Some people may need to be in a hospital for a short time for detoxification, when the drug leaves their body. This can help keep them as safe and comfortable as possible. Patients should talk with their doctors about medications that treat addiction to alcohol or opioids, such as heroin and prescription pain relievers.

Recovering from a substance use disorder requires retraining the brain. A person who’s been addicted to drugs will have to relearn all sorts of things, from what to do when they’re bored to who to hang out with. NIH has developed a customizable wallet card to help people identify and learn to avoid their triggers, the things that make them feel like using drugs. You can order the card for free at drugpubs.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brain-wallet-card.

“You have to learn ways to deal with triggers, learn about negative peers, learn about relapse, [and] learn coping skills,” Subramaniam says.

NIH-funded scientists are studying ways to stop addiction long before it starts—in childhood. Dr. Daniel Shaw at the University of Pittsburgh is looking at whether teaching healthy caregiving strategies to parents can help promote self-regulation skills in children and prevent substance abuse later on.

Starting when children are two years old, Shaw’s study enrolls families at risk of substance use problems in a program called the Family Check-Up. It’s one of several parenting programs that have been studied by NIH-funded researchers.

During the program, a parenting consultant visits the home to observe the parents’ relationship with their child. Parents complete several questionnaires about their own and their family’s well-being. This includes any behavior problems they are experiencing with their child. Parents learn which of their children’s problem behaviors might lead to more serious issues, such as substance abuse, down the road. The consultant also talks with the parents about possible ways to change how they interact with their child. Many parents then meet with the consultants for follow-up sessions about how to improve their parenting skills.

Children whose parents are in the program have fewer behavioral problems and do better when they get to school. Shaw and his colleagues are now following these children through their teenage years to see how the program affects their chances of developing a substance abuse problem. You can find video clips explaining different ways parents can respond to their teens on the NIH Family Checkup website at www.drugabuse.gov/family-checkup.

Even if their teen has already started using drugs, parents can still step in. They can keep closer tabs on who their children’s friends are and what they’re doing. Parents can also help by finding new activities that will introduce their children to new friends and fill up the after-school hours—prime time for getting into trouble. “They don’t like it at first,” Shaw says. But finding other teens with similar interests can help teens form new habits and put them on a healthier path.

A substance use problem is a chronic disease that requires lifestyle adjustments and long-term treatment, like diabetes or high blood pressure. Even relapse can be a normal part of the process—not a sign of failure, but a sign that the treatment needs to be adjusted. With good care, people who have substance use disorders can live healthy, productive lives. 

Written by: NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Managing Editor: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

Federal Narcotics Arrest in Nassau County, Florida

Federal Narcotics Arrest in Nassau County, FloridaOn May 6, 2015, a narcotics operation by the Fernandina Beach Police Department, the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office, and the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) resulted in the arrest of a Georgia man for distributing approximately three ounces of methamphetamine into Nassau County, Florida.

On two separate occasions Roland Johnson delivered methamphetamine to a confidential source working with law enforcement. The methamphetamine, which was determined to be the “ice” variety, weighed approximately three ounces. Johnson was subsequently charged federally for the distribution of over 50 grams of methamphetamine.

Johnson, forty-four years of age, was arrested at the Stateline Discount Store located in Hilliard, Florida. Law enforcement obtained information that Johnson would be at the store to meet with someone and surveillance was conducted which resulted in Johnson’s arrest without incident.

Johnson, pictured, is currently being detained in federal custody.

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I Had a Drug Problem When I was Young

I Had a Drug Problem When I was YoungHappy Father’s Day!!!

The other day I was in an old farmhouse in the adjoining county and someone asked me a rhetorical question, “Why didn’t we have a drug problem when you and I were growing up?”

I replied that I had a drug problem when I was young, “I was drug to church on Sunday morning. I was drug to church for weddings and funerals. I was drug to family reunions and community socials no matter the weather.

I was drug by my ears when I was disrespectful to adults. I was also drug to the woodshed when I disobeyed my parents, told a lie, brought home a bad report card, did not speak with respect, spoke ill of the teacher or the preacher, or if I didn’t put forth my best effort in everything that was asked of me.

I was drug to the kitchen sink to have my mouth washed out with soap if I uttered a profanity. I was drug out to pull weeds in mom’s garden and flower beds. I was drug to the homes of neighbors to help mow the yard, repair the clothesline, and if my mother had ever known that I took a single dime as a tip for this kindness, my dad would have drug me back to the woodshed.

Those drugs are still in my veins and they affect my behavior in everything I do, say, or think. They are stronger than cocaine, crack, or heroin, and if today’s children had this kind of drug problem, America would be a better place.

God bless the parents who drugged us!

The original author is unknown.

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What Fathers Need to Know About Synthetic Drugs

What Fathers Need to Know About Synthetic DrugsAs fathers becoming increasingly involved in raising children, it is important to recognize the dangers of drugs that are popular among teenagers and young adults. Among the substances that are gaining headlines are synthetic drugs. Before you talk to your pre-teen, teenager or young adult, you should learn about the basics of the substances.

Basics of Synthetic Drugs
A synthetic drug is a man-made substance that was created to have a similar impact on the body as well-known substances. The effects from the drugs are meant to mimic marijuana, cocaine and methamphetamines. Due to the chemicals that lace the drugs and the lack of clear guidelines to create the substances, it is particularly dangerous to substance abusers. In most cases, the drugs are put into two main categories: cannabinoids and cathinones. The cannabinoids are often called spice or K2 and contain THC, the common compound found in marijuana. Cathinones are also called bath salts and usually mimic the effects of cocaine or methamphetamine based drugs. The rise of synthetic drug abuse and the shockingly high rates of calls to the poison control centers around the country have led to a federal ban of common chemicals that are found in the synthetic drugs.

Dangers of the Drugs
The primary concern related to synthetic drugs that every parent should consider is the danger involved in taking the substances. Synthetic drugs are among the most dangerous substances that your teen or young adult can abuse. A major reason for the danger is the chemicals involved in the development of the drugs. Synthetic drugs are made with a higher level of chemicals than the natural forms of the substance. In the case of cannabinoids, for example, the drug can contain as much as 200 times the amount of THC than marijuana. Although the level of chemicals in the drug is a dangerous aspect of taking the substance, the limited details of the ingredients also play a role in the danger. Substance abusers never know what they are taking, the chemicals in the mixture or the potential problems with interactions.

Signs of Synthetic Drug Abuse
If you are worried about your teen or an adult child using synthetic drugs, then the signs and symptoms of abuse can help you recognize warning signs. Although some warning signs will develop over time, symptoms of an overdose or a negative reaction to the substance require immediate medical attention.

The mild signs of synthetic drug use include:
• Mood swings or anger
• Sweating
• Slurred speech or an inability to speak
• General restlessness

If you notice that the mild signs are present, then you might need to confront your teen about the problem.

Serious signs of synthetic drug abuse or a negative reaction to the substance after trying it once include:
• Seizures or severe shakes throughout the body
• Visual, auditory or tactile hallucinations
• Delusions
• Attempts at suicide
• Paranoia or signs of paranoid thought processes
• Extreme aggression or attempts to hurt others
• Heart attacks
• Strokes
• Death

When you notice signs of an overdose or you see changes to behavior, take your teen or adult child to the hospital. Immediate medical attention is necessary to control the physical symptoms of an overdose.

Seeking Help
Preventing synthetic drug abuse is only one side of the situation. Although you will want to talk to your teen about the dangers of drugs, it may be necessary to seek help if your teen begins using or abusing synthetic substances.

Rehab programs are available to work through the underlying causes of substance abuse and provide the right treatment approach for the drugs. In the case of synthetic drugs, the best treatment solutions will often include holistic healing, medical evaluations and personalized programs that focus on your teen’s specific healthcare and mental health needs.

Above all; Stay Involved
Staying involved in your child’s life requires an understanding of the dangers that your teen might face in the future. By recognizing the dangers of synthetic drugs, you can discuss the topic and answer questions before your teen has the opportunity to give into peer pressure or curiosity.

About the author:
Desmond White is a writer that specializes in addiction treatment and his true passion is helping people find treatment for addiction. He is currently promoting Best Drug Rehabilitation, click here to learn more about their facility and holistic treatment programs.

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Prescription Drug Take Back September 29, 2012

Prescription Drug Take Back September 29, 2012Prescription drug abuse is our nation’s fastest-growing drug problem, an epidemic whose source is too often right at home in America’s medicine cabinets. The easy availability of pain medications and a misconception that they are safer than illicit drugs even when abused, has led to shocking increases in prescription drug abuse.

Nationally an estimated 6.2 million people, 12 and older report having misused prescription drugs in the past month. Between 1998 and 2008, there was a 400 percent increase in treatment admissions aged 12 and over reporting abuse of pain relievers. And the Centers for Disease Control reports that the number of unintentional drug overdose deaths involving opioid analgesic pain medications more than tripled between 1999 and 2006, totaling more overdose deaths than those from heroin and cocaine combined.

Prescription drugs are easily diverted for illegal use. More than 70 percent of people who abuse prescription pain relievers say they obtained them from friends or relatives. When used appropriately, these drugs can be tremendously beneficial, and policies to decrease abuse of prescription drugs must balance the dangers of misuse with the need to keep them available for legitimate use. The president’s national drug control strategy outlines steps to reduce prescription drug diversion and abuse.

One of the easiest ways individuals can help reduce this problem is to properly dispose of unused or expired medications. Communities nationwide will be having prescription drug take-back programs this month, allowing individuals to safely dispose of expired or unused prescription drugs at collection sites operated by local law enforcement officials and approved by the Drug Enforcement Administration. This not only reduces the potential for diversion of these drugs, keeping them out of the hands of our children and others, reducing accidental overdose, but it also significantly helps reduce the impact of disposal on our environment. Appropriate and safe disposal of all medications should become the new norm in our communities. Take back programs are clearly a win-win for both public health and public safety.

As part of our efforts to address this problem, the Fernandina Beach Police Department and the Nassau Alcohol, Crime and Drug Abatement Coalition (NACDAC) are partnering with the DEA drug the nationwide drug take back program to collect potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs for destruction.

This service is free and anonymous. No questions asked.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Many Americans are not aware that medicines that remain in home cabinets after proper use are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are increasing at alarming rates, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, many Americans do not know how to properly dispose of their unused medicine, often flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away, both potential safety and health hazards.

Police officers from the Fernandina Beach Police Department will be collecting these unused or unwanted prescription medication at the Publix Shopping Center located at 1421 Sadler Road in Fernandina Beach. The event will be held from 10:00 AM until 2:00 PM on Saturday September 29, 2012. The Nassau Alcohol, Crime and Drug Abuse Coalition (NACDAC) supports this effort by providing the first 100 people that participate with the Drug Take Back Program with a $5.00 Gift Card to Publix.

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Local Drug Dealer Sentenced to 30 Years

Local Drug Dealer Sentenced to 30 YearsFernandina Beach, FL – A local man was sentenced this afternoon to serve two consecutive terms of fifteen years for each conviction for cocaine distribution. Enrico Roberts was found guilty of the charges from two separate drug trials last month and was sentenced by Judge Robert Foster to a lengthy stay in the Florida State Prison system.

Roberts sold cocaine on two separate occasions to an undercover confidential informant that was working for the Fernandina Beach Police Department. Roberts was arrested in December 2010 by Fernandina Beach Police and agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA Task Force). Sixteen other arrests were made at that time during the investigation dubbed “Operation Island-wide.”

Roberts has a long history with local law enforcement for drug related crimes, dating back to 2001 when he was charged with the sale and distribution of cocaine and for firing a weapon into a dwelling. He served five years in state prison for these offenses. He was later arrested again for various offenses, including marijuana possession and destroying evidence (2008), trafficking cocaine (2008), possession of cocaine within 1000 feet of a school (2008), possession of methamphetamines with intent to distribute (2008), and loitering/prowling and cocaine possession (2009).

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Relaxation Brownies Not Suitable for Children

Relaxation Brownies Not Suitable for ChildrenI fueled up at a Fernandina Beach convenient store and my daughter pointed at a brownie and said we should split it. I laughed it off because we don’t eat brownies since we are perpetually dieting. On our way back to the car she told me that the brownies have synthetic marijuana in them. I stopped cold in my tracks!

“What?” I asked.

“Yeah! The kids at school are talking about them.” she answered.

Finding that very hard to believe, I walked back into the store and bought The Original Lazy Cakes Relaxation Brownie. The clerk working the counter said they had melatonin in them; a supplement I occassionally take when I have trouble sleeping, NOT synthetic marijuana.

The package is labeled:
“FOR ADULTS ONLY: NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN
DIETARY SUPPLEMENT (Not for food use)”

I examined the package closer and it had the Food and Drug Administration’s disclaimer, “This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure or prevent any disease.”

Really? The logo on this little 2 ounce brownie shows an animated and quite relaxed brownie character, named Larry Lazycakes, with a purple and pink psychedelic background. “He looks pretty chilled-out to me,” I thought and flipped the package over.

This side of the packaging revealed:
“WARNINGS: THIS PRODUCT IS FOR ADULTS ONLY. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. If you are taking OTC drugs or prescription medication, pregnant or nursing, consult your health care provider prior to using this product. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery after consuming this product. Do Not Use with any alcohol.” That is quite a warning for a brownie!

Then I read that it contains 4mg Melatonin per serving, there were two “suggested use” servings in the pre-package brownie I purchased.

“Melatonin is a hormone made by the pineal gland, a small gland in the brain.” According to WebMD, “Melatonin helps control your sleep and wake cycles.”

I already knew that, so I ran upstairs to see how much melatonin is in the supplements I take. “Take one tablet 20 minutes before bedtime.” The bottle read. Each of my 100% vegetarian melatonin tablets contains only 3mg of melatonin. So, you are an adult and you eat the entire brownie, which you likely would because it is pre-packaged, you would be ingesting nearly three times the recommended dose of melatonin as a sleep aid. What would that do to a child?

At 330 calories per brownie and 8mg melatonin, I think I’ll stick to my smaller dose using supplements and avoid that groggy, hang-over feeling in the morning.

While some municipalites are trying to ban the sleep inducing snacks, I haven’t seen anything official for the state of Florida… yet.

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Fernandina Beach Drug Take Back Program

Fernandina Beach Drug Take Back ProgramFernandina Beach, FL – Prescription drug abuse is our nation’s fastest-growing drug problem, an epidemic whose source is too often right at home in America’s medicine cabinets. The easy availability of pain medications and a misconception that they are safer than illicit drugs even when abused, has led to shocking increases in prescription drug abuse.

Nationally an estimated 6.2 million people, 12 and older report having misused prescription drugs in the past month. Between 1998 and 2008, there was a 400 percent increase in treatment admissions aged 12 and over reporting abuse of pain relievers. And the Centers for Disease Control reports that the number of unintentional drug overdose deaths involving opioid analgesic pain medications more than tripled between 1999 and 2006, totaling more overdose deaths than those from heroin and cocaine combined.

Prescription drugs are easily diverted for illegal use. More than 70 percent of people who abuse prescription pain relievers say they obtained them from friends or relatives. When used appropriately, these drugs can be tremendously beneficial, and policies to decrease abuse of prescription drugs must balance the dangers of misuse with the need to keep them available for legitimate use. The president’s national drug control strategy outlines steps to reduce prescription drug diversion and abuse.

One of the easiest ways individuals can help reduce this problem is to properly dispose of unused or expired medications. Communities nationwide will be having prescription drug take-back programs this month, allowing individuals to safely dispose of expired or unused prescription drugs at collection sites operated by local law enforcement officials and approved by the Drug Enforcement Administration. This not only reduces the potential for diversion of these drugs, keeping them out of the hands of our children and others, reducing accidental overdose, but it also significantly helps reduce the impact of disposal on our environment. Appropriate and safe disposal of all medications should become the new norm in our communities.

Take back programs are clearly a win-win for both public health and public safety.

As part of our efforts to address this problem, the Fernandina Beach Police Department and the Nassau Alcohol, Crime and Drug Abatement Coalition (NACDAC) are partnering with the DEA drug the nationwide drug take back program to collect potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs for destruction.

This service is free and anonymous. No questions asked! This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Many Americans are not aware that medicines that remain in home cabinets after proper use are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are increasing at alarming rates, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, many Americans do not know how to properly dispose of their unused medicine, often flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away – both potential safety and health hazards.

Police officers from the Fernandina Beach Police Department will be collecting these unused or unwanted prescription medication at the Publix Shopping Center located at 1421 Sadler Road in Fernandina Beach.

The event will be held from 10:00 AM until 2:00 PM on Saturday April 23rd, 2011. The Nassau Alcohol, Crime and Drug Abuse Coalition (NACDAC) supports this effort by providing the first 100 people that participate with the Drug Take Back Program with a $5.00 Gift Card to Publix.

Prescription Medication Misuse:

    – 7 Floridians die every day from prescription medication abuse
    – In 2008, more Floridians died from medication

There are 5 times as many deaths as from all illegal drug poisonings than from car crashes.

Take Steps to Prevent Medication Misuse
1. Take medications with care: follow directions, have your pharmacist check for interactions between prescription, herbal and over-the-counter medicine.
2. Put medicines in a place where children and visitors can’t get them.
3. Don’t share medicines with others. It could cause illness and is against the law.
4. Dispose of unneeded medications:
a. Remove labels from pill containers
b. Mix pills with liquid to dissolve them
c. Stir in with coffee grounds, dirt or kitty litter
d. Seal container with tape and hide in an outdoor garbage can
e. Contact law enforcement agencies to find out more

Warning Signs that Someone is Abusing Medications:

    • Unexplained need for money. May borrow or steal to get it
    • Drop in attendance and performance at work
    • Engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviors
    • Appears fearful, anxious or paranoid with no reason
    • Lack of motivation; appears lethargic or ‘spaced out’
    • Periods of unusual activity or extreme sleepiness
    • Sudden mood swings, irritability or angry outbursts
    • Unexplained change in personality or attitude
    • Sudden change in friends, favorite hangouts and hobbies
    • Frequently getting into trouble fights, crashes, illegal activities

Florida Poison Information Center Network: 1-800-222-1222

What to do in an Emergency:
1. Signs of medication abuse vary depending on the type of medicine used.
a. Stimulants (diet pills, ADHD drugs, caffeine, etc.) can cause hyperactivity, agitation, twitching, irritability, lack of appetite, difficulty sleeping, restlessness, seizures, high blood pressure, fever, fast heartbeat and chest pressure
b. Depressants (muscle relaxants, pills for sleeping, pain relief or anxiety) can cause sleepiness, confusion, constipation, slow breathing, slow heartbeat, pinpoint pupils (black part of eyes get very small), noisy breathing (like snoring), vomiting, choking, weakness, coma and death
2. If a person has taken medications and you can’t wake them up, call 911. Never let them sleep it off. They may not wake up. Start CPR if needed
3. If someone has taken medications and you’re not sure what to do, call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. It’s free, confidential and open 24/7
4. If someone needs help for medication addiction, call SAMHSA Help Line at 1-800-662-HELP

For more Information:
www.nida.nih.gov/PDF/RRPrescription.pdf
www.helpguide.org/mental/drug_substance_abuse_addiction_signs_effects_treatment.htm
www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/pdf/prescrip_disposal.pdf
www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm101653.htm
www.flgov.com/drugcontrol/pdfs/20100813.pdf

Turn in your unused or expired medication for safe disposal

When: Saturday, April 23, 2011; 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Where: Publix Grocery Store
Remember: The first 100 individuals will receive a $5 gift card to Publix.

American Parks are Dangerous

Illegals Trashing Arizona

Illegals Trashing Arizona

America’s parks are attracting visitors involved in illegal activities and are no longer a safe vacation in the wilderness to experience with your family! By now everyone knows about the folks, cities and organizations that are boycotting Arizona over their controversial immigration laws, however, many residents of Arizona invite you to come see what those crossing the border illegally into the United States have done to their beautiful Sonoran Desert.

First let me say, I get many emails every single day and one of the first things I do when I see something amazing or perhaps unbelievable, I check the validity of the story with Snopes and other sources.

As much as I wanted this story and photographs of backpacks and discarded clothing to be false, apparently it is true. These pictures were taken on June 27, 2007 by Lance Altherr, the Tuscon Chapter Leader of the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps., just south of Amado, Arizona.

Illegal Border Crossing

Illegal Border Crossing

When the immigrants cross the border illegally, they carry clean clothes, food and water with them in backpacks. They change into fresh clothing and squeeze as many people as they can into vehicles, leaving no room for extra clothing or backpacks, so the items are left to create a makeshift landfill of parks and American landmarks. The photographer said, “We find a lot of brand new clothes and good backpacks which we donate to local schools.”

Sadly, the National Park Service is attracting sites like this at other parks, too, such as the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument.

Daniel Boone National Forest

Daniel Boone National Forest

Do not think that border states are the only ones with problems in the parks. Take a look at this safety warning on the official website for Daniel Boone National Forest in Eastern Kentucky. In 2009, ABC news reported about the problem in The Bluegrass State’s No. 1 Cash Crop: Dope when they said, “…the body of Bill Sparkman, a part-time census worked, was found bound and gagged and hanging from a tree.”

“Some visitors have different agendas besides relaxation, exploration and recreation. These agendas may include drug production, theft, arson, and other illegal acts. Avoiding these areas if discovered is the safest course of action. Report sightings to local law enforcement personnel only after you have relocated to a safe area.

Marijuana plots and methamphetamine labs, while rare, may be found on our forest. Those responsible for these illegal plots or labs are dangerous and should be avoided. If visitors inadvertently come upon these sites they should immediately depart the area and report the sighting to law enforcement officers. The chemicals used to grow or produce these illegal products can be highly combustible and pose considerable risk to hazards caused by fire and explosion.”

Memorial Day is just around the corner, how safe do you feel about packing up the family and taking them to one of our country’s national parks for a safe, family oriented weekend in the wilderness?

Operation High Tide Slows Local Distribution of Illegal Drugs

fernandina-beach-policeOperation High Tide has been successful identifying several individuals participating in obtaining, selling and delivering illegal prescription drugs according to the Fernandina Beach Police Chief, James Hurley, in a press release received this evening.

Press Release: (Fernandina Beach) A three-month undercover narcotics investigation conducted by the Fernandina Beach Police Department has effectively identified several individuals responsible for the sale and delivery of prescription drugs, and fraudulently obtaining prescription medications.

In July 2008, the Fernandina Beach Police Department initiated a proactive investigative strategy designed to impact the growing numbers of legal drug overdose cases, due to multiple drug toxicity and related causation. Since that time many suspects have been identified and arrested, hopefully reducing the numbers of senseless deaths in our community. This undertaking has required continued cooperation from the community and local pharmacies and this operation, referred to as “High Tide,” is an example of this exceptional partnering strategy.

Fernandina Beach detectives investigating these events have learned about numerous creative methods that people have utilized to obtain prescriptions medication illegally. Detectives have been working closely with the local pharmacies to reduce, identify, document and dismantle fraudulent prescription operations. We have also utilized undercover operations to identify those participating in the sale and delivery of prescription medications.

operation-high-tide

Roger A Reaves – 2 Counts Principal in the 1st Degree Of Sale/Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $50,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

Katherine Reaves – 2 Counts Principal in the 1st Degree Of Sale/Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $50,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

Eric Evans – Sale /Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $25,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

Steven Tasker – Sale /Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $25,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

William Green – Sale /Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $25,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

Melissa A Landrum – 1 Counts Principal in the 1st Degree Of Sale/Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $25,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

Heather L Flowers – 2 Counts Sale /Delivery Controlled Substance, Bond $50,000.00
Active Warrant (WANTED)

Cynthia A Jobin – Fraudulently Obtaining a Controlled Substance and Obtaining a Medical Drug by Fraud, Bond $10,004.00

Christina J. Elliot – Attempting to Obtain Controlled Substance by Fraud, Bond $10,002.00

Tamadge J. Dixion – Obtain Controlled Substance by Fraud, Possession of Controlled Substance, Trafficking Controlled Substance, Bond unknown

The Fernandina Beach Police Department will continue to actively work to protect our community from the dangers associated with illegal narcotics. Those choosing to distribute any type of illegal or legal drugs in the City should be aware that they may likely be investigated.

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