Chocolat Chaud A La Creole

Ally at the Desk has been in the kitchen translating French recipes into English as a high school assignment.

Chocolat Chaud A La Creole

Chocolat Chaud A La Creole

Ally at the Desk has been in the kitchen translating French recipes into English as a school assignment.

This homework has become a family favorite as we never know what she is up to when she hands over the shopping list to her father.

This recipe turned out to be for Hot Chocolate.

Hardly a beverage served up for the Memorial Day Weekend, but since it was assigned we weathered through the task at hand!

The French Recipe

Chocolat Chaud A La Creole

4 tasses de lait
1 oeuf
4 tasses de chocolat en pudre
6 cuilleres a soupe de sucre roux
1 cuillere a soupe de farine de main
1 cuillere a cafe d’ extrait de vanille
1 baton de cannelle
1 tasse de cacahouetes ou d’amandes

Faire chauffer le lait avac la vanille et la cannelle. Dans un bol, melanger le chocolat en poudre, le sucre, la farine de mais et l’oeuf avec un peu de lait froid. Verser dans le lait chaud et laisser epaissir. Retirer le baton de cannelle et ajouter les cacahouetes ou les amandes. Servir chaud.

Chocolat Chaud A La Creole

Chocolat Chaud A La Creole

Lets see how she did on the translation:

The English Recipe

Hot Chocolate

4 Cups of Milk
1 Egg
4 Cups of chocolate powder
6 Tablespoons of brown sugar
1 Tablespoon of corn starch
1 Teaspoon of vanilla extract
1 Cinnamon stick
1 Cup of peanuts or almonds

Heat the milk with the vanilla and cinnamon. In a large bowl, mi the chocolate, the sugar, corn starch and egg with a little cold milk. Pour in hot milk and let thicken. Remove the cinnamon stick and add peanuts or almonds. Serve hot.

Wow, this turned out to be incredibly sweet and having nuts in my hot chocolate took some getting used to. Cinnamon sticks could not easily be found at Food Lion, so as an alternative Ally sprinkled cinnamon atop the sweet, hot beverage!

All in all, the hot chocolate tasted more like a candy bar. I recommend serving this as a special dessert… in the winter!

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3 Comments

  1. tommylee

    Pretty good. Was wondering what Farine de Main was in the ingredients list but it got clarified in the preparation as Farine de maïs. Only part I miss is the ” à la Créole ” explanation/translation.

    There's actually a story behind the expression “Creole Style” which could date this warm drink to Napoleonic times. However we need to go back a bit in history since the Theobroma Cacao bean or Pod originated in the lower sections of the Amazonas. All other cultivations are just that, cultivations by human migrations. This is important since the earliest introductions of Cacao date back to Columbus in 1502 but was not recognized as a commodity in Europe until 1544 (or thereabouts). Once introduced to the Spanish Royal Court it quickly spread as a highly desirable alternative to Coffee and Tea, partially based on taste but mostly because of its medicinal properties. Diarrhea was one of the most common diseases due to bad hygiene and the astringents of Cacao “cured” many a diarrhea.

    “à la Créole”… The French cultivated Cacao plantations throughout their Caribbean Basin strongholds while the Portuguese, Dutch and British brought Cacao to the Philippines and Indonesia for further cultivation.

    The term Creole in itself refers to “mixture”, be it people, languages or cultures. “Creole” is not typically French although many people believe it to be. It stems from the latin word “Creo” which means “I Create”.

    So technically the translation of à la Créole could simply refer to the “creation (I make) Hot Chocolate”. However creation in food and beverages also means “Masterpiece” or “Outstanding” using uncommon or unexpected ingredients.

    The fact that the French cultivated Cacao on Haiti and the official Language in Haiti is/was “Creole” and the fact that many Haitians ended up in New Orleans during the founding by the French, we can be pretty certain that the recipe you described is in actuality not French but has “French on American Soil” roots.

  2. tommylee

    Pretty good. Was wondering what Farine de Main was in the ingredients list but it got clarified in the preparation as Farine de maïs. Only part I miss is the ” à la Créole ” explanation/translation.

    There's actually a story behind the expression “Creole Style” which could date this warm drink to Napoleonic times. However we need to go back a bit in history since the Theobroma Cacao bean or Pod originated in the lower sections of the Amazonas. All other cultivations are just that, cultivations by human migrations. This is important since the earliest introductions of Cacao date back to Columbus in 1502 but was not recognized as a commodity in Europe until 1544 (or thereabouts). Once introduced to the Spanish Royal Court it quickly spread as a highly desirable alternative to Coffee and Tea, partially based on taste but mostly because of its medicinal properties. Diarrhea was one of the most common diseases due to bad hygiene and the astringents of Cacao “cured” many a diarrhea.

    “à la Créole”… The French cultivated Cacao plantations throughout their Caribbean Basin strongholds while the Portuguese, Dutch and British brought Cacao to the Philippines and Indonesia for further cultivation.

    The term Creole in itself refers to “mixture”, be it people, languages or cultures. “Creole” is not typically French although many people believe it to be. It stems from the latin word “Creo” which means “I Create”.

    So technically the translation of à la Créole could simply refer to the “creation (I make) Hot Chocolate”. However creation in food and beverages also means “Masterpiece” or “Outstanding” using uncommon or unexpected ingredients.

    The fact that the French cultivated Cacao on Haiti and the official Language in Haiti is/was “Creole” and the fact that many Haitians ended up in New Orleans during the founding by the French, we can be pretty certain that the recipe you described is in actuality not French but has “French on American Soil” roots.

  3. hugo258

    I'll try today, it looks really tasty =P

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    SEO in France

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