Tsunami Awareness [Video]

Tsunami warning test messages for the Atlantic coasts first began broadcasting over radio and television in April 2009.

Tsunami Awareness

Tsunami Awareness

Tsunami warning test messages for the Atlantic coasts first began broadcasting over radio and television in April 2009. This was the first tsunami warning test to include the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the Unites States and her Canadian and Caribbean neighbors. The United States expanded preparedness activities and its tsunami warning system in 2005 after a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean struck with little or no warning killing 230,000 people in December of 2004.

The East Coast of the United States is considered at low risk for tsunamis, and SearchAmelia published an article to that effect in February Putting North Florida Tsunami Fears in Perspective, so we are not as educated about the risk as other parts of the world. The Indian Ocean region, too, was considered to have a relatively low risk for a destructive tsunami!

In April 2010, The United States Government Accountability Office reported on tsunami preparedness, “Although the number of Tsunami Ready communities has increased from 27 in 2006 to 74 as of February 2010, overall participation in this voluntary program remains relatively low among the more than 760 communities identified as at risk for a tsunami.” In the full 39 page report, Florida has 37 at-risk communities and only 2 are tsunami ready! We live on Amelia Island and residents and visitors to any coastline are encouraged to prepare personal tsunami plans.

I found this video about tsunamis that was made for children by San Diego County, California. In this video an animated crab teaches students valuable Tsunami preparedness information, such as tsunamis may travel at speeds up to 600 mph, and there are warning signs you should know. While this video is great for the kids in your life, because many of us know very little about tsunamis, I thought the video shared some very interesting information for parents and grandparents, too. Even though I am a little older than its intended demographic, I don’t think the tsunami safety song will ever become a top 40 hit! (The video is not as long as indicated. After the five minute mark you get a song and the last minute and a half are scrolling production credits.)

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzR0Rt3i4kc

[sc name=”email-announcer”]

5 Comments

  1. publisher_sa

    Tsunami warnings for North Florida would be several hours ahead of the actual landfall as even the central Atlantic Earthquake Ridge is 3 to 4 hours away. A pulling back of the ocean as a sign of a tsunami approach would be generally too late for us to run to an area at least 100 ft high. Since our coastline is rather gradual, no sudden drop offs, we would probably face fast rising tides rather than huge waves. Rooftops anyone?

  2. Ameliaprivateeye

    Are rooftops on Amelia Island high enough? We have the Ritz at 7 stories, a private residence in the Plantation I have been told is 8 stories, then the hill on North 18th Street and the lighthouse. Is there anything at a higher elevation above sea level than these on Amelia Island?

  3. publisher_sa

    It'll be crowded wherever we go. I'll prepare a Tsunami survival backpack, just in case.

  4. publisher_sa

    before I forget to answer your question on rooftops on Amelia Island being high enough. I think so. The 100 ft. parameter as suggested is for monster waves as a result of a sharply inclining coastline. What we have here however is a very gradual coastline which would result in a strongly rising tide of maybe 15-20 feet or a barrage of 3 or 4 much lower waves.

  5. publisher_sa

    before I forget to answer your question on rooftops on Amelia Island being high enough. I think so. The 100 ft. parameter as suggested is for monster waves as a result of a sharply inclining coastline. What we have here however is a very gradual coastline which would result in a strongly rising tide of maybe 15-20 feet or a barrage of 3 or 4 much lower waves.

Leave a Comment